Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken"

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Robert Frost's poems often relates to human misfortunes and fears, his response to the obstacles of life, and his acceptance of his burdens. His observations and natural details of his poems have symbolic significance, even reality beyond the observable physical universe. It is known that Robert Frost's best works were written in England. During 1916, Robert Frost, an English professor at Amherst College, encouraged his students to write out their thoughts creatively while he wrote "The Road Not Taken", one of his famous poems today. Judging from the title, tells us that the theme of this poem are about life and choices.

The first stanza of the poem reveals the uncertainty and difficulty in trying to make a decision while he regrets because he sees that there were "Two roads diverged in a yellow wood/ And sorry that I could not travel both" (1-2) He observes the two roads and sees that one of the roads was "…grassy and wanted wear" (8) while the other was just "…worn them really about the same" (10) depicts Frost's desire to not necessarily follow the others. "Yet knowing how way leads on to way, /I doubted if I should ever come back." (14-15) he decides that he wants to try something new and go down the path that no one took. Despite the lengths he goes to see where each road ends, he cannot see pass where the road stretches, also comparing to life choices; not knowing the future ahead of time.

The last stanza connects to the first stanza of the poem where he regrets not taking the other road when "I shall be telling this with a sigh/ somewhere ages and ages hence" (16-17) Even though years later he wonder about what could of happened, he is content with his decision. "Two roads diverged in a wood, and I---/ I took the one less traveled by, / and that has made all the difference" (18-20) He realizes that the decision he made was the right choice because it made him the way he is.

In conclusion, Robert Frost's message to the readers is to look beyond what...
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