Research Paper on Dont Ask Dont Tell

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Repeal Don’t Ask Don’t Tell

The Don’t Ask Don’t tell act which prevented openly gay and lesbians from serving in the United States Armed forces was placed into law on December 21st, 1993. It states that the military cannot discriminate against any gay, lesbian or bisexual person as long as they are discreet about their sexuality. They believed that any persons showing or acting in homosexual behavior would go against strict military moral codes and policy. However on September 20th, 2011 the Don’t ask Don’t Tell was repealed because the government felt it was discriminatory against homosexuals. I agree that openly gay and lesbians should able to serve in the military because nobody should have to hide who they are in order to serve and defend our country.

In this paper I will first give a brief explanation and history on The Don’t ask Don’t Tell policy. I will then say why the policy should be repealed and how it may be beneficial to the military. Then I will state the opposing views of the repeal of the policy, and lastly I will conclude with my final thoughts and restate why I agree with the repeal of this policy

Brief Explanation of Don’t Ask Don’t tell Policy

The don’t ask don’t tell policy which was enacted in 1993 was created so military personal could not discriminate against any gay or lesbian being as long as they were discreet about their sexual orientation. The military felt that being openly gay or lesbian while enlisted would cause too much controversy and go against moral codes. If gay or lesbian person disclosed their sexual orientation with anyone they would be fired or discharged.

In the 1950’s President Truman signed the Uniform code of Military Justice, which states that all homosexuals are to be discharged from serving in the military and are not, allowed to enlist in the military. In 1992, over forty years later President Bill Clinton promised to lift the ban on homosexuals in the military. It was the first thing he tackled as President, which caused a lot of controversy in the white house. There was an immediate attempt for repeal but it failed. In 1993 Don’t ask Don’t Tell which was formerly known Personnel Eligibility Act of 1993 was signed into law.

Even though the pentagon agreed to allow the law, it still did not stop investigating whether those serving in the military were gay. If any member was found and proven to be a homosexual they were discharged. The years following the laws passing 12,000 men were discharged from the military.

Since then there have been countless attempts too repeal this law and it finally came forth in 2010 by President Obama.

Those for Repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell

As I stated earlier, I believe that openly gay and lesbians should able to serve in the military because nobody should have to hide who they are in order to serve and defend our country. If any person fits the criteria to serve in the military they should be able to. Today 25 countries allow gays to openly serve in the military been no complaints of harassment, discord, blackmail or bullying, nor any erosion of unit cohesion or military effectiveness. Some examples of countries that allow openly gay persons to serve in there military include Russia, Israel and the United States closest neighbor Canada. In fact one of Israel’s most viewed army magazines Bamahane, showcased two men hugging each other on a 2009 cover.

These countries do not only accept gays into there army they also embrace them. I am not saying we have to have a gay army couple on the cover of every army but just give them the same chances as everyone else. They are people just like any one else and their only difference is their sexual orientation. This country is filled with different people and there are many different types of people currently enlisted in the military. No one person is the same as the other. If that were the case there would be no need for the military because everyone would have the same...
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