Research Methodology

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Topic: Marketing Strategy of Ford Motors (Failure and Success)


1. Acknowledgement

2. Introduction

3. Aims and Objectives

4. Research questions

5. Literature Review

a. History of Automobile industry

b. Marketing strategy?

c. Marketing strategy of Automobile Industry

d. Comparison of marketing strategy of Ford Motors with the top automobile companies

e. Failure of Marketing strategy of Ford Motors that leads the company to lose its position from the BIG 3 companies in the USA

6. Arguments on marketing strategy of Ford Motors (Failure and Success)

a. Losing of Market

b. Selling of its child companies like Land Rover, Jaguar and other

7. Methodology

8. Recommendations

9. Conclusion

10. Bibliography

11. Appendix

Marketing strategy of Ford Motors:

Ford management controls possibly the most famous automobile brand in the world. Over many years the Ford business structure has had to adapt to changing markets, trends and economic conditions. (Edward de Bono and Robert’s Heller, 2006, Ford Motor Company Management, ‘Thinking Managers’, available at (24/07/2009)

Mark Fields had a message when he took over as President of Ford Motor's North and South American operations last September: "Change or die," he would tell his colleagues. Among them was his new boss, family heir Bill Ford, who assumed the role of CEO in October, 2001, in an effort to turn around the company's sagging fortunes.

Today, Ford is still trying to engineer a turnaround -- and Fields is Bill Ford's field general. On Jan. 4, the carmaker posted a year-over-year sales decline of 9% in December -- its fourth consecutive monthly drop despite this being new-car season. For 2005, Chevrolet outsold Ford for the first time in 19 years. Ford's domestic market share has fallen to 15.6%, down almost five percentage points since 2001. And Ford stock closed at $8.01 a share on Jan. 4, almost half what it was when Bill Ford took over four years ago.

Fields, 43, meant his warning back in October, and means it now, he told an audience at the Greater Los Angeles Auto Show on Jan. 4. He explained he had delivered a similar warning to Japanese auto maker Mazda five years ago, when he ran its struggling global operations for Ford, which holds a controlling stake. He has certainly been consistent: "It's time to take back our future. And the clock is ticking," he told the auto show crowd.

NEW TWIST.  Fields is a relative newcomer at the tightly knit Ford Motor, where turnover in the executive ranks is low compared to many other corporations -- he has been at the company a mere 17 years. Fields has also run Ford Europe and the company's Premier Auto Group, which includes Volvo, Jaguar, Land Rover, and Aston Martin.

On Jan. 23, Ford will announce a detailed plan for growth, dubbed "The Way Forward," which will include plant closings, the discontinuation of some models, and staffing cuts, Fields revealed. All those things were part of the Bill Ford-led turnaround plan launched in January, 2002, which hasn't produced strong enough results.

But the latest effort has one new twist -- a strategy to revitalize Ford's main brands of Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury, and a stronger emphasis on development of new products. Fields, in fact, is the first executive at Ford in modern memory who has brought "a true marketing mindset to the top of the company," as Ford's chief North American designer, Peter Horbury, puts it.

SLOGAN ROTATION.  In truth, Ford has always been a more sales-driven company than most. "It has always been a move-the-metal company," says Fields, even if its legacy as having invented the auto assembly line has sometimes obscured its marketing creativity.

Ford changes or tinkers with its ad slogan and brand strategy every 18 months or so, as executives change...
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