Report on Global Youth Tobacco Survey (Gyts) and Global School Personnel Survey (Gsps) 2007 in Bangladesh

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Report on Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) and Global School Personnel Survey (GSPS) 2007 in Bangladesh

World Health Organization Regional Office for South-East Asia New Delhi

11 June 2008

Preface
The study is about tobacco related behavior of dental students in Bangladesh. It tries to assess the smoking prevalence, knowledge and attitudes towards tobacco use and role of dental health professionals in tobacco control. All the 3rd year students of seven out of nine dental colleges have been surveyed for this study. Results indicates relatively high smoking prevalence among dental students and suggests a strong need for tobacco cessation training among health professionals to help their patients to quit smoking. The study has been undertaken as part of Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) initiated by the World Health Organization (WHO), Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA), and Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA in 1999. The author is grateful to a number of organizations and individuals, too numerous to na me, for their support for successful completion of this study. The study would not have been possible without the support from WHO South-East Asia Region Office (SEARO) and CDC. The author would particularly like to thank Dr. Khalil Rahman of WHO-SEARO and Dr. Samira Asma, Dr. Wick Warren, Dr. Nathan Jones, and Dr. Mark Tabladillo of CDC for their support throughout the study. The author would also like to thank Dr. Mostafa Zaman of WHO-Bangladesh for his support. Finally, the author would also like to thank the Principals, Executives, Teachers and 3rd year students of all the Dental Colleges of Bangladesh for their kind and cordial cooperation in carrying out the survey. While credit goes to all, the errors and omissions are completely of the author. The author also appreciates any comments on this report.

(Dr. Zilfiqar Ali) 29 April 2005

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Table of Contents

Preface Table of Contents Fact Sheet I. II. III. IV. V. Introduction Methods Results Discussion Conclusion and Recommendation Text Tables References

1 2 3 4 6 7 9 11 13 17

2

Fact Sheet

3

HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN TOBACCO CONTROL: EVIDENCE FROM GLOBAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL SURVEY (GHPS) OF DENTAL STUDENTS IN BANGLADESH 2005 I. Introduction

Health professionals can play a significant role in preventing tobacco initiation, encouraging current smokers to quit, and facilitating cessation attempts. Studies have shown that even brief counseling by health professionals on the dangers of smoking and the importance of quitting is one of the most cost-effective methods of reducing smoking1 . Health professionals serve as role models for healthy behavior to the public. Licensed health professionals are acknowledged sources of accurate information to maintain and improve health because they require specialized training to achieve their credentials. Health professionals are the most personal face of the public health infrastructure in many countries. During routine visits, health professionals can persuade patients not to start smoking, provide cessation assistance to patients who want to quit smoking, and counsel patients who have not decided to quit smoking. Throughout the world, some health professionals smoke cigarettes or use other forms of tobacco. Evidence has shown a wide range of prevalence among health professional students in several countries2-5 . Health professionals who ignore epidemiologic evidence and continue to use a substance that is harmful to health send an inconsistent message to patients they counsel to quit smoking. Studies have shown that health professional students who smoke are less likely to acknowledge tobacco as a serious health threat6-7 , less willing to provide cessation assistance to patients8 , and more likely to practice other unhealthy behaviors than non-smoking health professional students9-11 . When health professionals smoke, their ability to convey strong anti-tobacco...
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