Reign of Terror

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 294
  • Published : February 14, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Shaleen

The Reign Of Terror
The Reign of Terror, also known just as “The Terror”, was a brief period of time in the French Revolution full of complete disaster and bloodshed. Over 20,000 people were “officially” executed, while many died in jail, due to many causes, mainly consisting of an organization (Mythyloke; Britannica.com). On September 5th of 1793, the Revolutionary Government of France decided to make “ Terror” the order of the day and to take severe actions against those suspected of being enemies: "It is time that equality bore its scythe above all heads. It is time to horrify all the conspirators. So legislators, place Terror on the order of the day! Let us be in revolution, because everywhere counter-revolution is being woven by our enemies. The blade of the law should hover over all the guilty." (TellingIt ; History.com ) In Paris specifically, more than 3000 people were executed by a process known as guillotine. Although it was not made by ahim, the guillotine process was introduced in France by Dr. Joseph Ignace Guillotine. The main idea was that it was a quick way for all condemned prisoners to be punished with ( Britannica.com ; Mytholyoke) It has been widely debated by many historians the reasons why the French Revolution took such a radical turn during the Reign of Terror of 1793–94. It is clear however that the main cause is due to the leader of the Committee of Public Safety which was created by the National Convention. In 1793, the Jacobins removed the weak Girondists, and set themselves as the new members of the committee ( TellingIt ; Mytholyoke ). Thus, the foundation of the Terror is centered on the April 1793 creation of the Committee of Public Safety and its militant Jacobin delegates. The National Convention believed that the Committee needed to rule with "near dictatorial power" and the Committee was delegated new and expansive political powers to quickly respond to popular demands (Britannica.com). From June of 1793,...
tracking img