Reconstruction Dbq

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Reconstruction Period DBQ

From the beginning of the Civil War until the end of the Reconstruction, the United States went through what can be called a revolution. During the time period of 1860 to 1877, many constitutional and social developments brought great change to the country. Some constitutional developments that caused conflict were the Emancipation Proclamation and the reconstruction, while some social developments, which could possibly have lead to a revolution, were the Freedmen's Bureau, the Black Codes, and the KKK.

Prior to 1860 the America was already split into two sides, the north and south. To prevent too much conflict, they implemented numerous compromises such as the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850. Although these did ease tensions to some degree, they only temporarily delayed the problems. It started when Abraham Lincoln was elected as president. South Carolina was the leader of the southern states and was the first to secede in 1860 of the states. After Lincoln was inaugurated in 1860 seven states ceded from the Union and soon after four more joined them. The south believed that they had the constitutional right to secede (Doc A). South Carolina feared that the north would gain enough power over the south that they would abolish slavery in the south. South Carolina felt that their powers were being overpowered so they had no choice but to secede from the Union. This of course was the start of a very bloody war for both the northern and southern states. This struggle led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the freeing of the slaves in the confederacy. However this was only the beginning of the revolution, which the nation was going through. The end of the Civil War marked the end of the violence but the beginning of the reconstruction of the nation. The United States still had many issues to address. One such issue was the new banking and currency systems. Senator John Sherman felt that the country was not nationalized...
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