Reckless Driving

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 567
  • Published : March 3, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
What is reckless driving what are some examples of reckless driving and what are the consequences of reckless driving?

Reckless driving is a moving violation. A moving violation is any violation committed by the driver of a vehicle while it is in motion. Moving violations are more likely to directly cause physical harm to persons and or property.

People who are convicted of this crime can face a fine, deportation, revocation of parole, and the suspension or cancellation of driver's license. In some areas, the penalties vary, depending on the specifics of the offense, and the law may have several categories established. In order to be considered reckless driving, activity on the road must include a demonstrated disregard for the safety of property, animals, and people. Someone who is driving recklessly may have a willful disregard of safety, or may simply have a wanton attitude about the rules of the road. In either case, in order for people to be successfully convicted, demonstration of the disregard must be provided in the form of testimony from witnesses about the person's driving. Police officers, for example, can testify about seeing someone engage in a series of reckless acts. Some examples of recklessness can include ignoring basic safety laws, such as laws forbidding people to pass in front of oncoming traffic, laws prohibiting crossing train tracks in front of an oncoming train, and laws regulating speed. People who exceed the speed limit by an unusually high amount may be considered reckless drivers because they are putting other drivers in danger. Likewise, activities like swerving, repeatedly driving through red lights, and so forth can also be grounds for charges, as can driving with the intent to elude a police officer.
tracking img