Rastafarianism

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Rastafarianism

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What is Rastafarianism?
Rastafarisn is a young, Africa-centred religion which developed in Jamaica in the 1930s, following the coronation of Haile Selassie I as King of Ethiopia in 1930.

Rastafarian Beliefs
The most definitive list is found in the 1977 book The Rastafarians The Dreadlocks of Jamaica by scholar Leonard Barrett who lists what he regards as the six basic principles of Rastafarian. He developed the list by attending public meetings and through anthropological research into the movement. The main beliefs:

1. Haile Selassie I is the Living God
2. The Black person is the reincarnation of ancient Israel, who at the hand of the White person, has been in exile in Jamaica 3. The White person is inferior to the Black person
4. Jamaica is hell Ethiopia is heaven
5. The Invincible Emperor of Ethiopia is now arranging for expatriated persons of African origin to return to Ethiopia 6. In the near future Blacks shall rule the world
Rastafarianism has changed their beliefs as the years went on.

Early beliefs
The basic tenets of early Rastafarian, according to preacher Leonard Howell included some very strong statements about racial issues, as might be expected in the religion of an oppressed people living in exile: 1. Hatred of Whites

2. Superiority of Blacks
* Blacks are God's chosen people
* Blacks will soon rule the world
3. Revenge on Whites for their wickedness
* Whites will become the servants of Blacks
4. The negation, persecution and humiliation of the government and legal bodies of Jamaica 5. Repatriation: Haile Selassie will lead Blacks back to Africa 6. Acknowledging Emperor Haile Selassie as God, and the ruler of Black people

Modern Rastafarian beliefs
From the 1930s until the mid1970s most Rastafarians accepted the traditional Rastafarian beliefs.But in 1973 Joseph Owens published a more modern approach to Rastafarisn beliefs. In 1991...
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