Racial Segregation

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Running head: Racial Segregation

Racial Residential Segregation
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Segregation is defined as the division of people of different races of daily activities, such as education and housing. While no longer considered acceptable, racial segregation still exists. Racial residential segregation is specifically the division of whites and minorities in communities. It is obliviously present in many American minorities’ lives today. This separation within certain residential areas correlates to the continuance of metropolitan destitution in America. The existence of racially segregated housing communities has maintained society from achieving true racial equality. The Apartheid era demonstrates how the urban ghetto was created by whites during the first half of the twentieth century in order to isolate growing urban populations. Despite the Fair Housing Act of 1968, segregation is perpetuated today through an interlocking set of individual actions, institutional practices, and governmental policies also known as institutional racism.

In the post-World War II era, prejudice against Black Americans influenced Federal housing policies and affected the implementation of housing regulations. The Fair Housing Act is one of these policies and it prohibits discrimination in housing on the basis of: race or color, national origin, religion, sex. It was passed and signed into law on April 11, 1968. The Fair Housing Act theoretically put an end to housing discrimination; however, residential segregation proved to be remarkably persistent (Massey and Denton, 1993:186–216). Despite these policies, unequal restrictions on Black American’s housing in areas dominated by Whites were continuously fulfilled. In American Apartheid, Massey and Denton explain the central cause of poverty among African Americans is segregation. Despite the Civil Rights movement, discrimination on housing has been painfully unwavered. The majority of big cities are divided...
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