Race: Skin Deep?

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According to the Webster’s New World College Dictionary, Race is defined as any of the different varieties or populations of human beings distinguished by a) physical traits such as hair, eyes, skin color, body shape, etc.: traditionally, the three primary divisions are Caucasoid, Negroid, and Mongoloid, and the many subdivisions are called races, b) blood types, c) genetic code patterns, d) all their inherited characteristics which are unique to their isolated breeding population. When someone hears the word ‘race’, they usually just think of the color of someone’s skin; but race is so much more than that. Your race defines not only what you look like but even some of your personalities. People tend to be drawn to people of the same race as them; for example Italians will hang out with Italians and Germans will hang out with Germans. Most people are drawn to people who are like themselves, which isn’t always a bad thing. It becomes a bad thing though, when you don’t come outside your comfort zone and met new people who are different from you. It is extremely important to expand your horizons and met new people.

I went to a very small high school. I graduated with seven other Caucasians, like myself and one African American. If you would talk to him today, he would say that he loved us all and we were like a family to him. We never looked down at him or thought of him as different. We loved him the same and we truly were like one family. In our high school, there were a couple Indians, a few African Americans, and one girl from Thailand. With a school that small everyone knew everyone. Caucasians were the majority by far, but personally I never looked down on the handful of students that looked differently then me. To me, color was always skin deep. I would get to know the real person underneath the skin and then form my opinion of them. I hate when people assume something about a person because of the way they look and then they refuse to get to know them because of something they heard. They might have missed out on a great chance to meet someone who they could have been great friends with. But they missed out because of what someone else said about that person. When I started looking at colleges, diversity was one of the many reasons I choose SUNY Old Westbury. I love having the different cultures, races, and ethnicities all around me. I went to a Christian school so everyone was Christian. I love being in a class filled with students who are Muslims, Jewish, etc. I love learning from them about their culture and their own lives. In my private school, I learned all about Muslims, Hindus, Jewish people, and people of all religions. I could tell you the facts about the religions and the history of almost any main religion. But I don’t think that is the important part. I think it is much more important to know why someone believes what they do or why they choice to live this certain lifestyle. You can only learn so much from text books, the important things you need to know about people comes only from getting out there and getting to know people. Some people are scared to be placed in situations where they will be the only one who is different. I love being in situations were I am the only Christian and I have the chance to talk to someone about my faith. When placed in situations like that, I have to remember to be open- minded but never compromise my own faith. I am confident to be in situations where I am the only Christian because I know I’m not going to back down on my faith. To me the main think about me is my faith, it isn’t my race. I don’t define myself by being Spanish and German. Everyone has different ways to define themselves. Some people define themselves by being Puerto Ricans or some people will even define themselves by being very wealthy. People who define themselves by their social class place most of their pride in having material objects. The main problem with...
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