Promote Professional Development

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LHS2 – Promote professional development

Outcome 1 – Understand principles of professional development

1.1
The important of continually improving knowledge and practice is that you can ensure that you are aware of any new relevant legislation and also you can improve the service that you provide. It also gives you the opportunity to reflect on what you are good at as well as what you are not so good at, so that you can see what areas you can improve in.

Professional development is an opportunity to reflect, share common goals, support each other as well as learn from others knowledge, expertise and experience. Regular supervision and training of staff can lead to reduced sickness and absence, it can improve the service that they provide and allow them to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses. It will eventually lead to an increase in accountability and motivation in the workplace and improve recruitment and retention of current members of staff. The members of staff will improve in the service they provide and be more confident.

Professional development also assists in the everyday pressures and challenges that are faced in our line of work, and enables us to deliver appropriate and relevant care to our service users.

1.2
Potential barriers to professional development may be a lack of facility with language or literacy and members of staff may be embarrassed that others may learn of this. Dyslexia and learning difficulties may make professional development a longer more intense learning path.

Another barrier may be that members of staff may already think they hold the relevant knowledge they require to fulfil their jobs from many years of being in the profession.

Age can always be a major barrier to someone’s professional development as if a member of staff is of an older age they may be reluctant to learn new skills as the number of years they have left before retirement may be short. So they see it as a waste of time and resources, whereas for these members of staff the training would benefit them immensely.

In many cases the reluctance for professional development may come from someone not wishing to admit they require new skills and knowledge to carry out their duties effectively.

1.3
There are several different sources and systems for professional development, each having their own benefits:

• Practical or classroom training
• Online e-learning
• Colleagues and other professionals
• Supervisions/Appraisals
• Complaints and compliments

Everyone learns and develops in different ways and benefits from different types of learning.

Practical, classroom and online e-learning are ideal ways of refreshing skills training and learning the practical ways of carrying out moving and handling. As well as finding out about changes in legalisation that affects health and social care.

Learning from colleagues and other professionals can be both positive and negative as it is an excellent way of picking up how to carry out tasks and seeing how others do things, but also there is a possibility of picking up bad habits and can lead to cutting corners.

Complaints and compliments are an ideal ways to highlight what is going well and what needs improving from a service users point of view, which is important to ensuring we are providing person centred care.

1.4
Factors we need to consider when selecting opportunities and activities for keeping knowledge and practice up to date is what will be gained, who will it benefit and why it is relevant to our job roles. We need to consider individuals goals and what they want to achieve in their roles to match appropriate development.

Also the need to keep up to date with changes in legislation and working practices are important to everyone’s role, therefore this is important development and this would be essential for all members of staff.

Outcome 2 – Be able to prioritise goals and targets for own...
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