Progressive Era Dbq

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Progressive Era

The progressive leaders led the reform process of the nation’s industrial economy in the early years of the 20th century. Through the antirust acts, inspection acts, and regulations on trading, progressive reformers reshaped the way the economy ran. In a political cartoon by the Washington Post in 1907, President Roosevelt is on a dead raccoon with the words “bad trust” shaved into it. The political cartoon does over exaggerate the effectiveness of Roosevelt’s policies regarding trusts, but it does represent the way Roosevelt started the new regulation policies. In his second presidency, he started the “square deal.” This deal first passed Hepburn Railroad Regulation Act of 1906 which put regulations on the industry. Next, the square deal went after the meat industry. In the Neill-Reynolds Report of 1906, the meat industry was accused of insanitary food practices. “Meat scraps were found being shoveled into receptacles from dirty floors where they were left to lie until again shoveled into barrels…” stated the report. This caused Congress to pass the Pure Food and Drug Act and Meat Inspection Act. With the election of Woodrow Wilson in the 1912, he sold his idea of “new freedom”. As stated in the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914, “It shall be unlawful for any person engaged in commerce that directly or indirectly discriminated in price between different purchasers…” “The effect of such discrimination may be to substantially lessen competition or tend to create a monopoly in any line of commerce…” The act was put forth by President Wilson to encourage business competition. However, the act was attacked by the conservatives who caused it to not take full effect in legislation. However, a similar act, the Federal Trade Commission Act, took full force. This act set up an agency that regulated business’ actions and helped determined whether they were lawful or not. In a statement made by Herbert Croly in the New Republic, Croly questions Wilson’s...
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