Professional Beggar Problem

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Professional Beggars Problem in China City Today
-------- Adopting the PATH model

By: Yuyi Weng (Regina) I6044354 Xiaojun Liu (Christie) I6057147

Social Psychology and Interaction Experiment Code: EBC4203 Content

Introduction------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3

PATH: Problem ------------------------------------------------------------------------------4

PATH: Analyses -----------------------------------------------------------------------------8

PATH: Test -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------12

PATH: Help ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------15

Reference ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------17

Introduction
Police in Shanghai published a list of beggars who have been caught most often on metro trains over the past four years on 21 August 2012, sparking debates about the problem of “professional” beggars. The scorekeeper, who has been caught 308 times, is 22-year-old young man from Anhui province in perfect health, following by an 88-year-old woman with a record of 292 times[1]. Of the various problems which our country faces today, the problem of begging is one of the most acute ones. Every one of us has seen numerous kinds of beggars. Some are blind, lame or crippled, and so take to begging. Child and orphan beggars also are very common. However, others, who are physically sound before they join the begging “career” but undertake is as their profession, for it enables them to earn their living easily. The causes of begging are many, and they are very similar between inland China beggars and those in other developing countries (e.g. India, Pakistan etc.)[2]. First of all, some people, mostly the elder and the very young, are physically incapable of doing any work and have no other skills. The only way of getting food open to them is begging. They also deserve the sympathy of others. Secondly, some people take to begging due to natural disasters. Thirdly, some criminals when they come out of jails are not treated sympathetically by society. They are not given any chance to begin their life afresh. Becoming a beggar is the only way to find a shelter. On the other hand, mostly in the big cities, some people, who do not suffer from poverty and handicap, see the trade of begging flourishing and beggars earning their livelihood in a very easy way, they just enter the profession. In order to earn more sympathy, they broke their own legs or putrefied their own skin; or even worse, some kidnapped other people’s children and handicapped them. There are also illegal organizations which train children in the art of begging. One can argue that improper social rehabilitation and salvage mechanism may cause the problem in the above paragraph. But the truth is the mature Homeless Shelter & Aid Station system in China’s big cities leaves little room for criticism. We not only provide food, water and shelter in these aid stations, we also provide job consultancy service for the health ones and train tickets to send them home. So, what is the motivation of these people (some even with a college degree) to become professional beggars? Let us compare the following two income numbers first. The average monthly income of a middle-level manager in Beijing is around US$1440 ($65 daily) before tax; the average daily income of a professional beggar who “work” on metro trains in Shanghai is US$130, and tax-free. To top it all, on 13 November 2012, a male beggar carrying a kid was spotted getting on his Audi A6 sedan after “work” in Qingdao city, east China’s Shandong province.[3] These professional...
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