Privacy Is Overrated

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In the essay “Privacy is Overrated” written by David Plotz, Plotz conveys to the

reader exactly what the title implies. Plotz feels that our privacy has been abolished, but

we have nothing to be afraid of. To assert his opinion, Plotz begins the essay with facts

about himself that explains ways in which he has been relieved of some privacy in his

everyday life. Plotz explains that his computer’s hard drive is flooded with cookies from

organizations that monitor his actions on the web, telecoms pinpoint exact locations of

his phone calls, and credit reporting companies are well aware of late payments he makes.

Plotz believes that the public’s privacy is being invaded by the government. He

describes the government as “Big Brother” and says that “Big Brother” watches over

everyone regardless of having the consent of the people or not. The government watches

us, keeping tabs on everything we purchase and where we take our vacations with

intentions to find clues on terrorism, according to Plotz. The author believes that the

information that the government obtains isn’t our true privacy, so we should turn a blind

eye to “Big Brother’s” watchful eye. Plotz describes genuine privacy as the ability to

share one’s desires, goals, and mistakes with others. He believes we grow to trust each

other as a result of surrendering some of our privacy to “Big Brother”, which according to

Plotz, helps us find a sense of worth. Plotz concludes that the government’s invasion into

our lives is not only nothing to be worried about, but it is also beneficial to our

relationships amongst each other, helping us to trust each other with our actual private

lives.
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