Principles for a Catholic Morality

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Theology –Christian Responsibility

Principles For A Catholic Morality

Timothy E. O’connell, the author of Principles For a Catholic Morality , attempts to speak plainly and directly about a topic which is, after all ,our own lives as we live them. As a personal synthesis, he tried to make the book blend the worlds of ordinary living and scholarly reflection. O’connell is the director of the institute of Pastoral studies at Loyola, Chicago. He is also the author of ‘ What a Modern Catholic Believes About Suffering and Evil’. The book ‘Principles For a Catholic Morality’ is not only addressed to students of Theology or to clergy, but also to anyone interested in understanding the living of the Christian life.  O''Connell explores the concept of a moral person, the shape and dynamics of a moral world, and the implications not only for the individual Christian but for the community as a whole

Theologian Jean Danielou stated, “Christians often confuse the terms ‘religion ‘and ‘revelation’”. She defined religion as a term we use to denote all those efforts of human beings to touch the transcendent, to contact and appease the divinity. She defines revelation as indicating divine initiative, the actions by which God approaches and touches us. It proclaims not human searching but divine salvation, not human effort, but divine gift. The precise goal of theology is its most specific objective in all that it does, is not truth, but meaning. This is the appropriate incarnation of the perennial experience of faith in the passing flesh of particular cultures. Theology has reflected on revolution both as a gift to and a challenge for the human person. History, scriptures, and dogmatics all play a role in writing this book. "Surely deserve more than passing attention" and proposes to deal with each, but in reality he attributes to them little importance. His real criterion is stated clearly enough: "meaning" (though it turns out that by this he really means...
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