Pride and Prejudice & the Merchant of Venice

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The question asks us, “Explore the ways in which Jane Austen and Shakespeare present strong feelings in ‘Pride and Prejudice’ and ‘The Merchant of Venice’.
Shakespeare and Jane Austen both present strong feeling of love, revenge, hatred and friendship. They are two different types of stories, ‘Pride and Prejudice’ is a novel and ‘The Merchant of Venice’ is a play so therefore they both have different ways of presenting strong feelings but they do have some similarities. In ‘Pride and Prejudice’ strong feelings are presented by: 1. The Narrator

2. Letters
3. Dialogue
Whereas in ‘The Merchant of Venice’ strong feelings are presented by: 1. The characters
2. Long Speech’s
One way that Jane Austen presents strong feelings is through letters. Throughout the play Jane Austen presents strong feelings of love, hatred or sorrow by writing letters, for example when Darcy writes a letter to Elizabeth after their heated conversation when Elizabeth rejects Darcy’s proposal, you can see what Darcy is feeling:- “Pardon me, It pains me to offend you”

You can clearly see that Mr Darcy thinks that this letter would upset Elizabeth because he says in the letter that he is so against the relationship between the relationship and possible marriage between Jane and Mr Bingley. In ‘The Merchant of Venice’ Shakespeare present strong feelings through long speeches as “The Merchant of Venice” is a play, so the audience can see the strong feelings:- “’The pound of flesh which I demand of him is dearly bought; ‘tis mine, and I will have it” pg.70. This is when Shylock demands his pound of flesh of Bassanio. This long speech is when the Duke is questioning Shylocks unusual bond. Shylock the Jew is determined to take revenge and to take the pound of flesh. The ‘Merchant of Venice’ is a play, so you cannot see feelings through letters; this is why Shakespeare presents strong feelings through speeches. Another way that Jane Austen’s novel and Shakespeare’s play are similar is that both stories have many relationships. Elizabeth and her sister Jane are very close and share secrets:- ‘”When Elizabeth and Jane where alone… expressed to her sister how very much she admired him”’ or pg. 309 Elizabeth has 4 sisters, Lydia, Kitty, Mary and Jane. Elizabeth and Jane are very close as they are similar in age, whereas the other sisters and much younger and Elizabeth thinks they are very immature. In ‘The Merchant Of Venice’ Antonio and Bassanio have a very close friendship you may even say that they are like brothers. Antonio agrees to the bond so he can lend money to Bassanio so he can go to Portia. You can see that they are very close as Antonio is willing to give his life for Bassanio. When Antonio is in the court and about to die, Bassanio is right by his side. “’I’ll seal to such a bond’” ’” You shall not seal to such a bond for me’” (Bassanio) Even though Bassanio wants to stop Antonio from agreeing the bond, Antonio is determined to seal the bond as he thinks his ships will be back within 3 months, but unfortunately they crash out at sea and all his money is lost. As well as strong friendships Jane Austen and Shakespeare also involve many relationships to show strong feelings of love. In ‘Pride and Prejudice’ Mr Darcy and Elizabeth have a strong relationship. Similarly, in ‘The Merchant of Venice’ Jessica and Lancelot also have a strong relationship. In both stories they will do anything for love, even if it means betraying their religion or their social class. In ‘Pride and Prejudice’ Mr Darcy thinks that having money and having social class is very important, so when he falls in love with Elizabeth; who hasn’t got much money and who hasn’t got social class and standing Mr Darcy feels ashamed that he loves Elizabeth but he still proposes to her even though all his friends think that this is wrong:- “’In vain I have struggled. It will not do…You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you’” pg. 156 In ‘The...
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