Pride and Prejudice: Social, Political and Intellectual Issues

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When gazing into the social, political and intellectual issues of the late 18th century, it is clear the massive impact this book had on the society at that time. During this period of time, the world, specifically the English-speaking world, was in the midst of a dramatic change. Being in the heart of the American Revolution meant many things for the people of England. As with any war, it brought the people of the nation together whilst pushing them further apart simultaneously. The connection of this era of time to the literary viewpoint of Pride and Prejudice is directly correspondent to the overwhelming issues of this period. Austen’s book challenges the reader of any generation by challenging the accepted status quo of the 18th century, and thus challenging the status quo of any era.

During this period of time, social class was a prominent factor on a person’s potential within a society. The class of which a person was a part dictated various things within that person’s life. It determined the types of jobs that were available, and it influenced the spousal choice pool. With such a staunch view of social class, there was not a large amount of freedom in life and love. Likewise, women were still thought of a second-rate citizens. In the eyes of society, a young woman should have the proper training to be the ideal wife. Anything more than that teaching was preposterous. Additionally, the war brought distress to the land and in the heart of mothers throughout the country. During this war, men were not the only ones who would go into war, but women as well. However, any women and children that went into war did not go to serve the country, but rather, serve the soldiers. The presence of women and children in the soldier’s camps were highly distressing to everyone involved.

In comparison to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the connections to that period of time shine brightly. Regarding the social connection, Austen challenges the thought of a prominent...
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