Prejudice in to Kill a Mocking Bird

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Genesis Reyes May 06, 2013 Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird

Prejudice can be described as an opinion of a person based usually on race or religion before all the facts are known. Prejudice is an occurring problem during the twentieth century and is especially emphasized in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. In the novel, Harper Lee shows us the effects of prejudice on the ideas of the citizens in Maycomb County, more specifically social prejudice in some of the main characters: Arthur Radley and Atticus Finch. In the novel, Boo Radley is a victim of prejudice. Boo Radley is not accepted nor does he fit into Maycomb society because he is considered different from the others. He is not normal according to Maycomb civilians and therefore he is punished socially by a community that is very judgmental and biased. Boo does not act like a normal person and his actions are mysterious and abnormal. One day Boo was cutting the newspaper with scissors, and when his father passed "Boo drove the scissors into his parent's leg, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities" (12). Boo just sat there after stabbing his father. He did not apologize or feel regret for his actions. This event became a topic for gossip throughout Maycomb giving Boo the malicious reputation he has to live with. Boo Radley isolates himself from the people of Maycomb. He stays inside his home all day and nobody ever sees him. He stays inside his home because he knows that his society will ridicule him and will not allow him to let go of his past errors. The town often speculates what he does inside his home. People believe that Boo "went out at night when the moon was down, and peeped in windows... any stealthy small crimes committed in Maycomb were his work" (9). The town would accuse Boo for any misdemeanor or unexplained abnormality. Children...
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