Population Growth and Problems of Ageing and Urbanization in Asia Pacific

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GEOINFORMATICS EA Midterm REPORT
Population Growth and Problems of Ageing and Urbanization in Asia Pacific Name: ALDARAH, Jasem Ahmed A
ID No 12409147

Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Population growth in Asia Pacific in 1990-2009 and now 3. Demographic trends and Issues ,related to rapid population growth in region: a. Ageing
b. Urbanization
4. Conclusion :Some solutions and recommendations to the demographic related problems in the region

Introduction

Asia Pacific region with approximately 4.3 billion people, it hosts 60% of the world's current human population. During the 20th century Asia's population nearly quadrupled. The region is right now in rapid demographic transition. Population growth in the Asia-Pacific region is much slower overall than in previous decades, but the situation differs from one country to another, particularly in the components of growth – fertility, mortality and migration. Moreover, while many countries still have high levels of fertility, an increasing number have started to feel the impact of population ageing and urbanization- the major problems caused by the rapid population growth in the region. The paper will focus on the population growth rate in Asia Pacific, as well as on two major issues caused by this growth- ageing and urbanization and will consist of some recommendations on some action that have to be done in order to ensure the stable economic growth and to deal with the above mentioned demographic issues.

Population Growth in Asia Pacific
Historical populations|
Year| Pop.| ±%|
1500| 243,000,000| —|
1700| 436,000,000| +79.4%|
1900| 947,000,000| +117.2%|
1950| 1,402,000,000| +48.0%|
1999| 3,634,000,000| +159.2%|
Source: "UN report 2004 data" (PDF).|
|

Since 1990, the population of the Asia-Pacific region has been growing more slowly than that of the rest of the world. Between 1990 and 1995, it grew 1.5% annually but subsequently the growth rate declined steadily. By 2008, annual growth had fallen to 1.0% – the lowest rate among the world’s developing regions. Because more than half the region’s population are in China and India the region’s statistical averages are largely determined by these two countries. This can mask considerable variations between other countries, or groups of countries. Thus, although in 2008 the average population growth rate for Asia and the Pacific as a whole was 1.0%, in the landlocked developing countries it was 1.7%, in the least developed countries it was 1.6%, in the high-income economies it was 0.3%, and in the low-income economies it was 1.4%. Other countries currently experiencing population growth rates of 2.0% or more are: Macao, China;; Pakistan; Papua New Guinea; Singapore etc. In East and North-East Asia in 2008, the population growth rate was above 1.0% only in Mongolia and Macao, China. Countries where growth rates were positive but low – less than 1.0% a year – included:; DPR Korea; Hong Kong, China; Myanmar; Republic of Korea; Sri Lanka, Thailand; and several Pacific island developing economies whose population growth rates have been reduced by net outmigration.

Figure 1.1 Population growth for Asia Pacific region , 1990-2008

Demographic related issues related to rapid population growth in the region a.Ageing
Recent decades have yielded considerable transformations in the population structure in Asia and the Pacific owing to changes in birth and death rates in the region. Projections based on recent trends foretell that issues of population ageing will become increasingly important, with significant and pervasive social, economic and political implications. Hence, planning for the future merits priority consideration of the ageing of societies. The number of older persons (age 65 and above) in the region is estimated to increase threefold, from 420 million in 2010 to almost 1.3 billion by...
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