Poetry: Lyric and Narrative

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 148
  • Published : December 9, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
ELL126: Poetry: Lyric and Narrative Essay
‘Why is your face so sad and glum, my dear,’ ‘Why does your brow seem so furrowed, my dear?’
‘Spare yourself the details my love,
I fear your worry will reveal my truth.’

‘But what truth can bring such sadness, my dear,
What truth brings such a pale complexion, my dear?’
‘O save yourself from the burden my love,
I fear your worry will reveal my truth.’

‘Where is young Edward, Where is our son, my dear,
It is time he be fed, yet he has not shown, my dear?’
‘Please do not question, I could not answer, my love,
I fear your worry will reveal my truth.’

‘O Why is your blouse so speckled with blood, my dear,
What reason can cause such discomfort, my dear?’
‘O I have committed an unspeakable crime, my love,
I fear your worry will reveal my truth.’

‘What truth is it you speak of so often, my dear?
What crime is it you have executed, my dear?’
‘It is our son who no longer has mortality, my love,
I fear your worry will reveal my truth.’

‘How do you speak so coldly, my dear?
What have you done to my Edward, my dear?’
‘Our son no longer breathes our air, my love,
I warned you, and now your worry has revealed my truth.’

This poem is written in the form of a folk ballad in which a husband and wife engage in dialogue with a conversational tone, where it is revealed that the wife has killed their only son Edward. It is written in direct speech with two speakers. The effect I have aimed to create with this form is to distance the reader from any attachment or emotion towards the speakers in the same way that there is no connection emotionally between the two speakers of the poem.

The structure of the poem is in six quatrains with a consistent AABC rhyme scheme throughout each stanza. The first two lines of each quatrain comprises of questions asked by the husband to the wife which are then unanswered directly and avoided in...
tracking img