Poems with Theme with Life and Death and Their Analysis

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Some basic elements of poem and types of poem are included in this paper. Although there are countless number of poems on Life and Death, only the ones which seem noteworthy are studied and analysed in terms of themes. Different opinions of different poets on life and death found in their poems are also presented and contrasted in this paper. This paper will be of use and help to the learners of English.


To many, Death creates uncertainty and fear. It seems we shall never meet again. But the poets remind us of the essential truths of life, death and immortality. In her poem Turn again to Life, the poet Mary Lee Hall, says “If death is a chapter in a book, like moving from one room to the next, there is no reason for the passing of a loved one to result in endless pain and grief.” Poets inspire us to look on the bright side of life.

Rarely has the writer of this paper read poems that mention about life after death, as what Buddhists believe. It seems that most of those we happen to come across are written in English by poets who are Christians. However, some of the poems do not have anything to do with religion. Language can be used in several ways to tell a story, marvel at the wonders of nature, explain the universe, give advice, or ponder the mysteries of life and death. The sounds and syllables of language are combined by authors in distinctive, and often rhythmic, ways to form the literature called poetry. Poetry, like all literature, attempts to communicate an author’s emotional and philosophical responses to his or her own existence and to the surrounding world. It is an expression of what is thought and felt, rather what is known as fact. Nature and Use: Poetry is much harder to define, though it is perhaps more recognizable than other literary forms. In print poetry has a markedly different appearance from other types of literature. This difference may help to define the characteristics that separate it from the other types. Prose fills a page, while poetry ordinarily does not. It is usually printed in stanza form, much as songs are. Edgar Allan Poe said that the purpose of literature is “to amuse by arousing thought.” He defined poetry as the “rhythmical creation of beauty.” He insisted that a poem, to be a poem, must be short, and that a long poem is, in effect, a series of short ones. Poetry is usually recognizable by its dependence on syllable, foot, line, and stanza—four of the technical terms that pertain to structure. It is unlikely that any other kind of literature has as many technical terms associated with it as does poetry—such terms as meter, rhyme, assonance, consonance, and alliteration. There are also terms to define specific kinds of poems—lyric, elegy, ode, epic, ballad, dramatic, narrative, and didactic. The purposes of poetry are highly diverse. Some poems are meant to entertain, others to inform. Some teach a moral, while others serve as the basis of meditation. The Psalms in the Bible are poems that can be set to music for singing. Hymns used in Christian churches are also poems set to music. Other literary forms may serve similar purposes, but poetry does it in the fewest and best-chosen words for the occasion. At its simplest level poetry consists of children's rhymes. At a deeper level poetry tries to address the human condition and to express some universal truth. To associate poetry with truth is not to imply that everything a poet says is an eternal truth. It only suggests that the poet, like every other writer, perceives his world in common with everyone else but sees perhaps better than others the meaning of events,...
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