Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Obesity, Bariatric surgery, Adjustable gastric band
  • Pages : 8 (2378 words )
  • Download(s) : 76
  • Published : October 16, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Regina Steele
September 8th, 2010
Speech 107
Class 49

Adjustable Gastric Band Outline

Topic: Lap band Surgery General Purpose: To inform people about lap band surgery Specific Purpose: Inform the audience on how lap band surgery works, comparison with other techniques, and band adjustments and diet after surgery.

A. Attention-Getter: According to the American Society for Metabolic Bariatric Surgery, bariatric surgery is not an easy option for obesity sufferers. It is a drastic step, a lifestyle change, and causes the usual pain and risks of any major gastrointestinal surgical operation. Today I will give you the information you will need to know should you consider having this procedure performed.

B. Credentials: I am a former Realize lap band patient. Considering gastric bypass several years ago and a lot of research after the lap band was introduced I would recommend this procedure to anyone who has been fighting with obesity. The only complication I have had was 8 months after surgery and a dramatic weight loss I developed gallstones and had my gallbladder taken removed.

C. Ties to the audience: Weight issues are something that most people deal with at one point in their life, be it the fifteen years of age, freshmen in college, or that tire around your waist that hits in middle age. Although these are minor cases others deal with more severe issues and I would like to inform you on one of the new procedures for weight loss, the lap band surgery.

D. Thesis: Obesity is a very serious problem in today’s society. The lap band is an inflatable silicone device placed around the top part of the stomach in order to treat obesity.
E. Preview of Main Points: Today I am going to provide you with the general information concerning laparoscopic surgery, criteria needed for lap band surgery, comparison of lap band surgery verses gastric bypass and band adjustments and diet after surgery.

Transition: My first point - Laparoscopic surgery

II.Body I:
A. Main Point I: Laparoscopic surgery
1. Supporting Point: A small incision (less than ½”) is made near or in the belly button. Carbon dioxide (this is a gas that occurs naturally in the body) is introduced into the abdomen to inflate the area and make a work space for the surgeon. The gas is introduced through a trocar, which is a device inserted through the incisions. Then a small laparoscopic camera is placed through the trocar into the abdomen. The camera sends a picture of the stomach and abdominal cavity to a video monitor, this gives the surgeon a good view of the abdominal cavity. A few additional, small incisions are made in the abdomen. trocars are placed in these incisions for the use of instruments with long handles to complete the procedure. The surgeon watches the video monitor as he works through these incisions. The surgeon creates a small circular tunnel behind the stomach, inserts the gastric band through the tunnel and locks the band around the stomach somewhat like an electrical tie. Even though it is not part of the procedure the surgeon I used lifted a small portion of the thin outer lining of the stomach, pulled it over the band and sutured it sown to help prevent slippage. Laparoscopic surgery is minimally invasive bariatric surgery, patients found recovery was faster, the felt better, spend more time doing recreational and physical activities and have more self- confidence than they did prior to surgery. {1}

2. Supporting Point: The placement of the band creates a small pouch, or stoma, at the top of the stomach. This pouch holds approximately ½ cup or 4 ounces of food. (The typical stomach holds about 6 cups of food). The pouch fills with food quickly, and the band slows the passage of food from the pouch to the lower part of the stomach. {2} As the upper part of the stomach registers as full, the message to the brain is that...
tracking img