Personality, Psychological Disorders, and Therapy Principles in Shutter Island

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Teddy (Andrew) is experiencing repression by blocking the events of his wife drowning their kids, and Teddy later killing her. Teddy (Andrew) shows repression by the anxiety in his dreams. In his dreams he sees a kids body floating in a lake and a lady drowning them. Come to find out these are his kids and his wife is the lady who drown them. Teddy (Andrew) has dissociative amnesia caused from the repressed memory of his wife killing their three kids and then teddy killing her. Teddy (Andrew) also has dissociative identify disorder. The evidence for this would be that he is not only Teddy, the U.S. Marshal, but he is also Andrew, the man who killed his wife because she killed their kids. Andrew’s wife suffered from bipolar disorder.

Teddy has a phobic disorder towards water. Evidence for this is Teddy getting sick on the boat and the quote from Teddy saying, “Pull yourself together Teddy it’s just water.” Andrew has schizophrenia this is shown through the following symptoms: disorganized thinking (he thinks he is Teddy, a U.S. Marshal working on a missing persons case), and disturbed perceptions (he has hallucinations of people frozen on a street, kids floating in a lake, etc. It’s also as if he were living in a dream because life seems bizarre and terrifying.) Dr. Cawley believes in the use of humanistic therapies because he thinks listening and focusing on the patient will help. “I have this radical idea that if you treat a patient with respect, listen to him, try and understand, you just might reach him.” - Dr. Cawley The island uses group therapy which is classified under a humanistic therapy. “We need to interview the patients who were in Rachel’s group therapy.” - Teddy Drug therapy is used on Rachel. “Rachel Salando is on a combination of drugs meant to keep her from becoming violent but it was only intermittently effective. The greatest obstacle to her recovery was her refusal to face what she had done.” Peter Brean, a patient being interviewed, suffered...
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