Paranoid Schizophrenia

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COLEGIO DE SAN ANTONIO DE PADUA
Guinsay, Danao City, Cebu

COLLEGE OF NURSING

NCM 105
PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

Submitted by:
Maria Pamela Olive A. Ocan
Yasnee Zayfa A. Talasain

Submitted to:
Mr. John Andro D. Banga. R.N., M.N.
Clinical Instructor (NCM105)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Introduction--------------------------------------------------------------------------1 II. Psychopathophysiology----------------------------------------------------------2 III. Description, Statistics & Incidence---------------------------------------------4 IV. Related Readings / Articles------------------------------------------------------5 V. Conclusion---------------------------------------------------------------------------9 VI. Video Presentation----------------------------------------------------------------10

INTRODUCTION
Paranoid schizophrenia represents the most common of the many sub-types of the debilitating mental illness known collectively as schizophrenia. People with all types of schizophrenia become lost in psychosis of varying intensity, causing them to lose touch with reality. Untreated, people with psychotic disorders lose their ability to function in daily life. Typically, a paranoid schizophrenic experiences auditory hallucinations along with deluded thought processes and beliefs. They often believe others plot and conspire against them or their family members.

People with paranoid schizophrenia tend to fare better than those suffering from one of the other subtypes. They experience fewer issues with concentration, memory, and emotional apathy, allowing them to function better in everyday life. Patients often describe life with paranoid schizophrenia as a dark and fragmented world – a life marked by suspicion and isolation where voices and visions torment them in a daily waking nightmare. Researchers do not have a clear understanding of the causes of paranoid schizophrenia symptoms or those associated with any of the sub-types. Although experts believe that brain dysfunction has a role in causing the onset of most types of the disorder, they don’t know what causes the dysfunction initially. Research indicates that both genetics and environmental triggers work together to trigger the onset.

Paranoid schizophrenia is an illness that lasts all the way through the individual's life - it is a chronic condition. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia require treatment on a permanent basis; even when symptoms seem to have receded - a tempting time for schizophrenia patients to say they are fine and need no more help. Treatment is basically the same for all forms of schizophrenia; there are variations depending on the severity and types of symptoms, the health of the patient, his/her age, as well as some other factors. Treatment options include drugs (medications), psychotherapy, hospitalization (or partial hospitalization), ECT (electroconvulsive therapy), and vocational skills training. If the patient's paranoid schizophrenia is left untreated there is a serious risk of severe mental health, physical health, financial, behavioral and legal problems, which may have an enormous impact on every part of the individual's life. DESCRIPTION OF PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

Paranoid schizophrenia is a schizophrenia subtype in which the patient has false beliefs (delusions) that somebody or some people are plotting against them or members of their family. People with paranoid schizophrenia, as with most subtypes may also have auditory hallucinations - they hear things that are not real. The individual may also have delusions of personal grandeur - a false belief that they are much greater and more powerful and influential than they really are.

Paranoid schizophrenia is the most common schizophrenia type. An individual with paranoid schizophrenia may spend an extraordinary amount of time thinking about ways to protect themselves from their persecutors.

Typically, a person with paranoid...
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