Osmosis in Egg

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Title : Osmosis in Quail’s Eggs

Research Question
What is the effect of different concentrations of sodium Chloride (NaCl) on the mass of the de-shelled quail’s eggs? Introduction
Osmosis is an example of passive transport. Osmosis is defined as the movement of water molecules, down its concentration gradient, from an area of high water concentration (low solute concentration) to an area of lower water concentration (high solute concentration) through a selectively permeable membrane. Osmosis doesn’t need energy in form of ATP since it is passive transport and move down the concentration gradient. Cells respond to their external environment by shrinking, swelling, or staying the same based on the movement of water molecule. The eggshell is made of calcium carbonate. When calcium carbonate is in contact with hydrochloric acid, a chemical reaction will takes place and carbon dioxide is released. This results in production of gas bubbles on the surface of the egg. Hypothesis

The higher the concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl), the lower the mass change of the quail’s egg after being immersed in the sodium chloride solution for 24 hours. In low concentration of sodium chloride solution, the solution will be hypotonic to the egg because the concentration of solute in sodium chloride is lower than the concentration of solute in water. Water molecules move from hypotonic to hypertonic solution. Thus, water diffuses in the egg membrane by osmosis and the mass of egg increases. In high concentration of sodium chloride solution, the solution will be hypertonic to the egg because the concentration of solute in sodium chloride is higher than the concentration of solute in water. Water molecules move from hypotonic to hypertonic solution. Thus, water diffuses out from the egg membrane by osmosis and the mass of egg decrease. Variables

Table 1 : Types of Variable
Types of Variables| Methods of Controlling|
Independent Variable : The concentration of sodium chloride solution| The concentration of sodium chloride is varied by 0%, 5%, 15%, 30% and 45% for each beaker. | Dependant Variable :The change in mass of quail’s egg | The egg are weighed using an electronic balance to weigh its mass after being immersed in sodium chloride for 24 hours.| Controlled Variable : i. The type of egg usedii- The time taken to immersed the eggs in sodium chlorideiii- The volume of sodium chloride used for each beakeriv- The concentration of hydrochloric acid used v- The volume of hydrochloric acid used| i- The egg used throughout the experiment is quail egg. Other types of egg cannot be used as the size differs. ii- The time taken to immerse the eggs is fixed at 24 hours iii- The volume of sodium chloride used is fix at 70 ml for each beaker containing the egg iv- The concentration of hydrochloric acid used to de-shell the egg is fixed to 2.0M v- The volume of hydrochloric acid used to de-shell the eggs is fixed at 350 ml|

Materials and Apparatus
Table 2 : List of Apparatus
No.| Apparatus| Quantity| Size|
1| Beaker| 1| 750 cm3|
2| Beaker| 5| 250 cm3|
3| Measuring Cylinder | 1| 100 cm3|
4| Petri Dish| 1| -|
5| Spatula| 2| -|
6| Glass Rod| 2| -|
7| Electronic Balance| 1| -|

Table 3 : List of Materials
No| Materials| Quantity| Size|
1| Quail’s egg| 5| -|
2| Sodium chloride (5%, 15%, 30%, 45%)| 70 ml (each)| -| 3| Hydrochloric acid| 350 ml| -|
4 | Distilled water| 70 ml| -|
5| Paper towel| 1 roll| -|

Methodology
A. Preparation of de-shelled eggs

1. Place 5 quail eggs in a 1000 cm3 beaker.
2. Pour 350 ml of hydrochloric acid into the beaker until the egg is completely immersed in the acid. At the same time, push the eggs down to ensure it will not float using spatula and glass rods. This is to ensure maximum reaction between eggs and the acid. 3. Wait for a while until all the shell is removed and make sure...
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