Oracle Rman Pocket Reference

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  • Published : September 28, 2011
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Oracle RMAN Pocket Reference By Darl Kuhn, Scott Schulze

Publisher : O'Reilly Pub Date : November 2001 ISBN : 0-596-00233-5 • Table Contents of Pages : 120

• Reviews • Reader Reviews

• Errata

Copyright Chapter 1. Oracle RMANPocket Reference Section 1.1. Introduction Section 1.2. RMAN Architecture Section 1.3. Starting RMAN Section 1.4. Executing Commands Section 1.5. Implementing a Catalog Section 1.6. Stored Catalog Scripts Section 1.7. Backups Section 1.8. Restoring Files Section 1.9. RMAN Command Reference

Chapter 1. Oracle RMANPocket Reference

Section 1.1. Introduction Section 1.2. RMAN Architecture Section 1.3. Starting RMAN Section 1.4. Executing Commands Section 1.5. Implementing a Catalog Section 1.6. Stored Catalog Scripts Section 1.7. Backups Section 1.8. Restoring Files Section 1.9. RMAN Command Reference

1.1 Introduction
This book is a quick-reference guide for Recovery Manager (RMAN), Oracle's utility to manage all of your Oracle database backup and recovery activities. This book is not a comprehensive backup and recovery book. It contains an overview of RMAN architecture, shows briefly how to backup and restore databases using RMAN, describes catalog setup issues, and provides quick-reference syntax diagrams of RMAN commands. The purpose of this book is to help you quickly find the syntax for, and use, RMAN commands to back up, restore, and recover a database. We assume that you, the reader, have basic Oracle database administrator (DBA) skills, and that you are familiar with backup and recovery concepts. We also point out that the batch mode examples in this book are scripted with Unix shell scripts. Many of these examples contain Unix paths that are appropriate for our environment. If you are developing your own set of scripts, you will want to change the examples to reflect your own environment.

1.1.1 Acknowledgments

Many thanks to "our man," editor Jonathan Gennick. His feedback and suggestions have added significant improvements and clarity to this book. Thanks also to the technical reviewers Jeff Cox, Tim Gorman, Dick Goulet, Mark Hampton, Steve Orr, Walt Weaver, and Jeremiah Wilton.

1.1.2 Caveats
We have taken the Pareto's Law approach in writing this book, in that we have tried to cover topics that you are most likely to encounter while using RMAN. This material does not cover every type of environment, nor does it cover all of the backup and recovery scenarios that you will encounter as an Oracle DBA. While some of the more common backup and recovery scenarios are covered in this book, it is still critical that you are comfortable with your RMAN implementation and can recover your database no matter what type of failure occurs. We can't stress enough the importance of regular testing in preparation for recovering from unplanned disasters. A sound implementation and regular testing will give you the confidence to handle the impending 2 A.M. call: "Hey, I'm getting this strange ORA-01116 error, unable to open file, what do I do?"

1.1.3 Conventions
UPPERCASE Indicates an RMAN keyword, SQL keyword, or the name of a database object. italic Used for filenames, directory names, and URLs. Also used for emphasis and for the first use of a technical term. Constant width Used for examples showing code.

Constant width bold
Indicates user input in examples showing an interaction.

Constant width italic
Used in syntax descriptions to indicate user-defined terms. [] Used in syntax descriptions to denote optional elements. {} Used in syntax descriptions to denote a required choice. | Used in syntax descriptions to separate choices.

_ Used in syntax descriptions to indicate that the underlined option is the default. O/S Abbreviation of "operating system."

.2 RMAN Architecture
Recovery Manager (RMAN) is a utility that can manage all of your Oracle backup and recovery activities. DBAs are often wary of using RMAN because of its perceived complexity and its control...
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