Operating System and Max File/volume Size

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Compare HFS+, Ext3fs, and NTFS. Choose the most reliable file system and justify your answers. (SLO 15) HFS+Ext3fsNTFS
Introduced in 1998Introduced in 1999Introduced in 1993
AppleLinuxMicrosoft
Unlimited charactersNo limit defined32,767 Unicode characters with each path component (directory or filename) commonly up to 255 characters long HFS+ is file system developed by apple to replace their Hierarchical file system as the primary file system used in Mac computers It is also used by IPod and it is referred to as Mac OS extended.Ext3fs or third extended file system is a journaled file system that is commonly used by the Linux Kernel. It is the default file system for many Linux distributions.NTFS is a Windows op and file allocation system. It is standard on Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows server 2003, Windows server 2008 Windows Vista and Windows 7. NTFS replaced the FAT file system as the preferred file system for Microsoft Windows operating systems. Max file/volume size 8EB/8EBMax file/volume size 2TB/32TBMax file/volume size 16EB/16EB

Compare inodes used in Linux and NTFS. Are they the same? If not, which one is better? (SLO 15) An inode is actually an entry in a list of inodes referred to as the inode list. Each inode contains information about a file including (1) its inode number (a unique identification number), (2) the owner and group associated with the file, (3) the file type (for example, whether it is a regular file or a directory), (4) the file’s permission list, (5) the file creation, access and modification times, (6) the size of the file and (7) the disk address (i.e., the location on the disk where the file is physically stored). Like Linux, NTFS uses inodes for the same purpose which means inodes has similar functionality and purpose in its two implementations (Pitafi, 2007). Reference

Pitafi. (2007). Comparison of Inodes used in Linux and NTFS Retrieved from,...
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