Odyssey

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The Odyssey

Although Odysseus was portrayed as a hero citizen in Homer’s epic The Odyssey, his fatal flaw, hubris, restricts him from being a good choice for the Greeks to use as a model citizen or hero. After Odysseus escaped the Cyclops lair, he taunted the Cyclops saying, “If I could take your life I would and take your time away, and hurl you down to hell! The god of earthquake could not heal you there.” Angered by Odysseus’ words, the Cyclops prayed to his father Poseidon, which was not good for Odysseus and his men. This shows that after Odysseus escaped from the Cyclops, his ego got the best of him and he couldn’t help, but taunt the Cyclops. It is clear that Odysseus is unable to control his ego, putting him and his crew in danger, which is not a good trait of a leader. Later on, Odysseus receives advice from Circe. After leaving Circe, Odysseus tells his crew, “ Sierenes weaving a haunting song over the sea we are to shun she said, and their green shore all sweet with clover; yet she urged that I alone should listen to their song.” Despite Circe’s warning about the Sirens, Odysseus feels that he is strong enough to endure the Siren’s song and lied to his crew about it. This shows that Odysseus has a huge ego because he feels he doesn’t need to listen to Circe’s warning. Odysseus’ fatal flaw, hubris, hindered his ability to be a good hero citizen.
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