Obesity in Children

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 552
  • Published : June 23, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Obesity in Children

1.0 Introduction

Article 1: Obesity among School Children – Causes and Treatment Writer: Prof. Dr. Nasoha Saabin
Source: http://mthago.wordpress.com/2011/05/14/obesity-among-school-children-causes-and-treatment/

Obesity among school children in Malaysia is gradually growing until the Minister of Health has issued a rule to prohibit school canteen from selling Nasi Lemak to the school children as he believes that Nasi Lemak has provided too much carbohydrate which is mainly needed by fishermen and farmers only (that are considered as energy-consuming jobs) and detrimental to the school children. The implementation of this rule has, however, raised arguments among the Malaysians including the writer as they believe that there are other causes contributing to the childhood obesity. First cause is the school children’s wrong lifestyle where they would usually take food with excessive amount of carbohydrate and sugar to ease their stress. Plus, the school children would usually take the wrong food which highly contains carbohydrate as their breakfast at the school canteen because the students have to leave for school very early until they can hardly have wholesome breakfast at home. Thirdly, most of the Malaysians will take fried food instead of boiled and steamed food as their lunch and dinner due to their inadequate lunch hour. The saturated oil of fried food is unhealthy to the body as it can become plague in the blood vessels of our body and lead to an obstruction of blood flow. Thus, it is strongly advised by the writer that school children should have a wholesome breakfast that contains fruits, vegetables, protein, fibres and green tea every morning. Fried food should be substituted with boiled and steamed food that contains least amount of saturated oil too.

Article 2: Obesity in Children
Writer: John McLennan
Source: http://softballone.com/rfe/obesity.pdf

Childhood and adolescents obesity is increasing drastically in Australia. Generally, children and adolescents with a BMI (Body Mass Index) over 85th percentile are considered overweight and those above the 95th percentile, obese. A few causes have been identified to have contributed to obesity in children. It may due to genetic, endocrine and other medical problems which have recognizably least contribution to this phenomenon. Plus, the food that has been technologically ‘modified’ in order to be more scrumptious, attractive and promoted is also the main factor. Moreover, the energy consumption of the children has been reduced due to the increase in sedentary activities of their daily routines that requires less energy. Lastly, the increasing use of cars and other forms of transport has caused the children to have less exercise such as walking and jogging in their daily life. Obesity is detrimental to the children as it has bad effects on growing bone, the endocrine, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal systems. Plus, childhood obesity tracks into adulthood. Obese children are likely to remain obese adults, with the associated health risks. Therefore, there are several methods can be applied in managing the children obesity. The parents should encourage appropriate eating patterns from a young age. Familial factors, whether physiological, psychological or cultural, are crucial as change will not occur without agreement and motivation in a family setting. School canteens should actively promote appropriate eating patterns. A combination of dietary modification, increased physical activity, decreased sedentary activity and behaviour modification is recommended for treatment of overweight and obese children.

2.0 Discussion

Obesity is defined as an excess of the normal body fat mass (Finer, 2003). This generally means that a child has too much or excessive fat content in his body for his height, sex, and age. It is really obvious that...
tracking img