Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Iran, Nowruz, New Year
  • Pages : 6 (1911 words )
  • Download(s) : 515
  • Published : May 24, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
In harmony with the rebirth of nature, the Iranian New Year Celebration, or NORUZ (norooz), always begins on the first day of spring. norooz ceremonies are symbolic representations of two ancient concepts - the End and the Rebirth; or Good and Evil. A few weeks before the New Year, Iranians clean and rearrange their homes. They make new clothes, bake pastries and germinate seeds as sign of renewal. The ceremonial cloth is set up in each household. hagi firooz, is someone who disguises themselves with makeup and wear brightly colored outfits of satin. These hagifirooz, singing and dancing, parade as a carnival through the streets with tambourines, kettle drums, and trumpets to spread good cheer and the news of the coming new year. The origins of NoRuz are unknown, but they go back several thousand years predating the Achaemenian Dynasty. The ancient Iranians had a festival called "Farvardgan" which lasted ten days, and took place at the end of the solar year. It appears that this was a festival of sorrow and mourning, signifying the end of life while the festival of norooz at the beginning of spring signified rebirth, and was a time of great joy and celebration.  

The other ancient symbolic representation of NOROOZ  is based around the idea of the triumph of good over evil. According to the Shah-nameh (The Book of Kings), the national Iranian epic by Ferdowsi, NOROOZ came into being during the reign of the mythical King Jamshid; when he defeated the evil demons (divs) seizing their treasures, becoming master of everything but the heavens and bringing prosperity to his people. To reach the heavens, Jamshid ordered a throne to be built with the jewels he had captured. He then sat on the throne and commanded the demons to lift him up into the sky. When the sun's rays hit the throne, the sky was illuminated with a multitude of colours. The people were amazed at the King's power and they showered him with even more jewels and treasures. This day of great celebration was named NOROOZ , and was recognised as the first day of the year  Chahar Shanbeh Soori

The night before the last Wednesday of the year is celebrated by the Iranian people as Chahârshanbe Soorî, meaning red Wednesday, the Iranian festival of fire. This festival is the celebration of the light (the good) winning over the darkness (the bad); the symbolism behind the rituals are all rooted back to Zoroastrian times, over 2500 years ago

The Festival of "Chaharshanbeh Soori" is Persian and celebrated by Persians for over 2500 years. Charshanbeh Soori is neither a religeous ceremony nor a political one, it is a celebration of ending a dark and cold season - "Winter" and starting a new brighter and more hopeful one - "Spring". The tradition includes people going into the streets and alleys to make bonfires, and jump over them while singing the traditional song Zardî-ye man az to, sorkhî-ye to az man (literally: "My yellowness for you, your redness for me; ", but figuratively: My paleness (pain, sickness) for you (the fire), your strength (health) for me  Give me your beautiful red color

And take back my sickly pallor

Serving different kinds of pastry and nuts known as Ajīl-e Moshkel-Gosha (lit. The problem-solving nuts) is the Chahārshanbe Soorī way of giving thanks for the previous year's health and happiness, while exchanging any remaining paleness and evil for the warmth and vibrancy of the fire. According to tradition, the living are visited by the spirit of their ancestors on the last days of the year, and many children wrap themselves in shrouds, symbolically re-enacting the visits. They also run through the streets banging on pots and pans with spoons and knocking on doors to ask for treats. The ritual is called qashogh-zany (spoon beating) and symbolizes the beating out of the last unlucky Wednesday of the year. 

Haft Seen
Is a spread with seven items which each symbolizes a wish or theme. All seven items in this ceremonial table starts with the...
tracking img