Normandy Landings and Cross Channel Attack

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  • Topic: World War II, Normandy Landings, Invasion of Normandy
  • Pages : 2 (549 words )
  • Download(s) : 865
  • Published : October 22, 2005
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D-Day, was on June 6, 1944, during World War II. It was the allied invasion of Normandy, a beach located on the French channel coast, in hope to penetrate the German army. General Eisenhower had organized the largest sea-to-land invasion in history. May 1944 was the original date for the invasion, but several difficulties forced a postponement until June. Eventually, on the morning of June 6, Eisenhower agreed to proceed with the invasion. Within hours a fleet of 3,000 landing crafts, 2,500 ships, and 500 naval vessels began to leave for the invasion. That night, hundreds of aircraft carrying parachutists flew over the Normandy beaches. When the infantry from sea made it to land it was about 6:30 AM on June 6. By the end of June, Eisenhower had 850,000 men and 150,000 vehicles in Normandy.

The United States wasn't alone though in World War II, among the United states other countries declared war on Germany such as Argentina, Finland, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, Uruguay, Turkey, Venezuela, Peru, Romania, Bulgaria, Ecuador, Bolivia, Iran, Italy, Liberia, USSR, Canada, UK, France, Australia, and New Zealand. The total casualty number of the whole invasion was over 550,000. The casualties consisted of 320,000 Germans, 135,000 Americans, 65,000 British, 18,000 Canadians, and about 12,200 French. D-Day, June 6, 1944 was the beginning of the end of the Nazi empire. It was one of the most important days in military history as Eisenhower's cross channel attack, the largest in history, proved an overall success.

D-Day, June 6, 1944 was the beginning of the end of the Nazi empire. It was one of the most important days in military history as Eisenhower's cross channel attack, the largest in history, proved an overall success. The actions of the American soldiers on Utah and Omaha beaches that day aided greatly in the overall triumph of the operation as a whole. The victory at Omaha came at a very high cost, and the soldiers who took part certainly had...
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