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Nicholas Nickleby Analysis

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Nicholas Nickleby Analysis

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1. Within the play, exposition is handled by characters’ narrating events that are relevant to him or herthem. Characters are illuminated only by a single beam of light in the dark theatre. Narrations are omniscient and character-specific,. sSpoken in the third person while keeping with their own distinctive voice. This use of exposition allows dialogue to seem more natural, for that reasonbecause there is less to be explained. The director also used letters, and diaries, narrated in this similar fashion, as devices to convey information. This allowsed the audience to view the play from a critical, rather than emotional, standpoint. The audience cannot go back and reread missing information, as they can while reading the Ddickens novel.

2. Attention is kept by organic dialogue., Tthe playwright does not seem to be speaking to the audience, allowing interaction between characters to seem more natural. Conflict between opposing characters’ intrigues the audience. Nicolas Nickleby is sensitive to others' feelings while his main adversary, Uncle Ralph, is cold-hearted. This polarity allows for interesting conflict. “The bad people are very bad, the good are very good” The non-interfering soundscape, used only asin light ambience, enhancesed drama. Unrealistic yet necessary lighting allowsed environment changes to seem more realistic in the single stage for many settings. Also, lighting aidesed expression of emotion.

3. The conflict structure of the two main characters, Nicholas and Ralph Nickleby, builds as the play progresses. The audience is often informed of their ambitions throughout the play, not by their directly speaking their intentions, but is made known bythrough their individual traits. The Major main antagonist, Ralph Nickleby, seems to only care aboutof matters concerning money;, this is revealed through his greedy personality. Though Ralph may not directly say “all I care about is money,” much of Ralph’s time on stage is spent seeking profit.,...