New Historicism

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CO-TEXT: A historical document which is contemporary with and studied alongside a literary document. COMEDY: A play or literary composition written chiefly to amuse its audience by appealing to a sense of superiority over the characters depicted with a (usually) happy ending for the leading characters. CULTURAL MATERIALISM:

- A critical practice that concentrates on the interventions whereby men and women make heir own history and situate the literary text in the political situation of our own (and not of its own day as New Historicists do). - It reads the literary text in a way as to enable us to “recover histories”. - It uses the technique of close textual analysis but often employ structuralist and post-structuralist techniques. - It works mainly within traditional notions of the canon.

EMPLOTMENT: The process by which a text is organized into a plot. EMPLOTTED: Organized into a plot.
EPIC: A long narrative poem celebrating the great deeds of one or more legendary heros in a grand ceremonious style. EQUAL WEIGHTING: A combined interest in “the textuality of history, the historicity of texts” (L.Montrose) FICTION-MAKING: The historian bestows a particular significance upon certain historical events and then matches them up with a precise type of plot. MAINSTREAM LITERARY HISTORY: : Old historicism, dominant historical scholarship, monological, earlier historicism, single political vision, internally coherent and consistent, the status of historical fact, a stable point of reference. NARRATIVE:

- A set of events (The story) recounted in a process of narration (or discourse). - A telling of some true or fictitious event o connected sequence of events, recounted by a narrator. NEW HISTORICISM:

- A critical practice that gives equal weighting to literary and non-literary texts. - It insists on the textualization of reality (from Derrida) and the premise that society is governed by the collusion between discourse and power (from Foucault). - It places literary...
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