My Favourite Gadget

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GDP stands for Gross Domestic Product, and is a way to measure how big the economy is. GDP measures the value of all final goods and services produced in a country.

Not all production is included in GDP:

1. If a transaction occurs in the underground economy that government statisticians can’t measure (criminal activity is a major source of this), it won’t be counted.

2. Things that people produce for themselves are typically not counted either (GDP reflects the value of an oil change if you took it to the garage, but not if you did it yourself).

3. Goods that are used as inputs to make other goods are also not counted (tires that Firestone sells to Ford to put on Explorers aren’t counted, because the value of the tires is included in the price of the Explorer)

The first two things aren’t counted because they are too hard to keep track of. The 3rd is not counted because then we would be double counting the value of the tires.

We can calculate GDP at least 2 different ways:

1. Income approach: GDP = wages + rent + interest + profit + (indirect taxes – subsidies) + depreciation +/- statistical discrepancy

2. Expenditure approach: GDP = consumption + investment + government spending + (imports – exports)

Both of these approaches are derived directly from the circular flow model. The value of GDP calculated by either method is identical.

1) Categorize each of the following goods as either consumption (C), investment (I), government purchases (G), exports (X) or imports (M) a. Sony Blu-Ray player made in Japan
b. A family’s birthday cake purchased at Cub
c. Microsoft’s purchase of 1,000 Dell computers made in Texas d. Pizza Hut’s purchase of a new pizza oven
e. Department of Defense’s purchase of 187 fighter jets.

2) Determine if the following are counted or not in calculated the US GDP a. You charge your neighbor $10 to babysit their kids b. The state...
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