"Morris, Bhaiya" by Clyde Hosein

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Story Assignment: "Morris, Bhaiya" by Clyde Hosein

Being caught between two worlds can be frustrating; one can feel accepted in one world and out of place in the other, and vice versa. In “Morris, Bhaiya” by Clyde Hosein, the titular character Morris, Bhaiya is already seen to be caught between two worlds due to his name. “Morris” is more of an English, Irish or Scottish origin, whereas “Bhaiya” is more of Swahili origin.

The first sentence of the story; “Morris was an island in a sea of Indians,” (277). This would paint the picture that Morris is an outcast in his hometown. He feels like he fits in with his friends, but others such as Miss Jenny; “the only other African living in his quarter of Enterprise,” tell him that he needed to do things that were African. But Morris seemed to prefer the things that were Indian like the drum he used or the Hindu and Muslim weddings he was invited to. “This was Enterprise and this was his kind of life,” (278); as Hosein tells the reader that Morris is perfectly content with everything regardless of being caught within two worlds. But as the saying goes, “When the winds of change blow,” once the election times come around Morris sees that his friends distanced themselves and now he is an “outcast.”

Morris shouldn’t try to fit into a particular culture. Usually when events happen that can cause a split in culture, people caught in the middle are pressured into taking sides. This creates opposition as well, as people will support only their culture instead of the reasons that caused the split. In Morris’s case, if he had to choose a side, he should choose the Black Party, due to the Indians showing ignorance even though they supported things like nationalism.
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