Monomyth: Alex Rider and Perfect Example

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  • Topic: Alex Rider, Special Air Service, Truth
  • Pages : 1 (324 words )
  • Download(s) : 71
  • Published : March 3, 2013
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Ruslan Babkin

Many works or multimedia today follow the concept of the monomyth, like the book Stormbreaker by Anthony Horwitz, which is a perfect example of a hero’s journey. This is because, Alex, the protagonist, has to become a spy, and to do that he has to face many challenges to be able to face the man who killed his uncle. This is how the book resembles it. To understand the monomyth, I first have to explain it to you. It consists of eight parts. The monomyth begins when the protagonist gets called to do something, and usually refusal follows. Then, the mentor meets with them, and convinces then to cross the threshold. After, they get various tests, allies, and they make some new enemies. Then, the protagonist starts to approach the final battle/event. Finally, they are tested with the greatest challenge of all, and after that the protagonist receives their long awaited award. The book portrays the characteristics of the monomyth very well. First of all, his uncle dies, and his curiosity calls him to investigate. Then, the MI6 want him to become a spy, but he refuses. Next, he meets with the director and he goes and trains with the British SAS. Then, he gets sent off into the villain’s lair and is all alone. He has to use his wits and a couple of useful gadgets to find out his plans. Finally, he got really close to the truth and is captured. He is put in an aquarium and is trapped, but he escapes with one of his gadgets. To finish the story, he wins the battle and he gets home to relax, and gets his long wanted closure. This book is a perfect example of Campbell’s monomyth ideas, and it has all of the elements portrayed by the monomyth. It shows us that most books, movies, TV shows, and other works use the format for their story line.
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