Moneyball Analysis

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Moneyball
In today's business world, any decision made by a manager can have serious implications on the progress of the organization. In addition to the intense pressure , the manager is also under constant scrutiny from his peers and supervisors. These is why modern baseball General Managers are surrounded with many men to advise his decisions and cut time. Oakland A's GM was able to lead his team to one game away from the World Series with the lowest Player Salary in baseball, with the help of only one man. Moneyball is about this revolutionary and dynamic pairs journey. Keeping all this in mind, any soon-to-be business manager needs to be fully prepared to defend his decision making abilities. The book Moneyball gives an exceptional idea of this process, as the manager of the featured baseball team is face with similar kinds of challenges that other teams in the league do not have to confront.

Every Manager in modern world is faced with limitation of recourses. Organizations expect the manager to make effective of decisions with a limited amount of resources on hand. However baseball has a skewed and unjust system. The Yankees have a payroll of over 200 million while the A's had to be competitive with a salary under 50 million. This was the case with Billy Bean, the manager of Oakland A's baseball team. He had to select the best possible players for the club with only a limited amount of money at his disposal. It is very important for a manager to think outside the box in these situations. Billy did just that and more. Billy Bean and his assistant Paul Deposta revolutionized the game of Baseball. Moneyball is about how they took a team which was the laughing stock of the MLB, into a powerhouse, beating teams with over 3 times their payroll.

Billy and Paul noticed how scouts looked at a players physical attributes more then what he can do on a baseball field. They condemned common baseball statistics like RBI's because they believed they did not...
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