Module 1

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Student Name _Shernika Smith___
Class Section _____092S ______
Reading Module #1
On Your Own

This activity gives you two reading passages with which to practice the Active Reading Strategies you learned in Reading Module #1.

Directions: Complete the activity by reading each passage and answering the questions. Do not forget to spell check and proofread your work. When you have completed this activity, please upload it to the Dropbox for this week.

Reading #1: The lie behind those gloomy national polls

Ask Americans how they feel about the world, said Michael Medved, and they wind up with a paradox.

Predicting|
Read the title and first sentence above. Now predict what you think the passage will be about.| Your prediction about the passage: I think this is about Voting and the Election|

Now read the whole paragraph.

Ask Americans how they feel about the world, said Michael Medved, and they wind up with a paradox. By a staggering majority, people tell pollsters that they disapprove of both Congress and the President, and two out of three say the US is headed “in the wrong direction”. Yet when asked about their lives, “Americans express overwhelming contentment and dazzling confidence.” A recent Harris pole found that nine out of ten people are satisfied “with the life they lead,” with 56% choosing the highest category “very satisfied.” Almost everyone expects life to be better in the next five years. Somehow Americans feel that they personally live in a “sun-kissed, optimistic island of happiness” while the country at large does not. How can this be? It’s actually not that surprising, given that we spend, on average, 30 hours a week immersed in television. On both the news and entertainment shows, the world is presented as rife with crime, terrorism, death, sexual depravity, personal humiliation, and bitter political conflict. Self-serving politicians add to the prevailing gloom by emphasizing problems and exaggerating threats. The real American story, though, is the one we live, in which people are making steady economic progress and life is mostly good- and hopefully better than it was yesterday.

Using the Questioning Strategy|
As you read the paragraph: 1. Do you find anything confusing, or that you wonder about? 2. Are there words you don’t know? What are they? 3. Is a sentence confusing? Which sentence or sentences?| Your questions about the passage: I wonder what he means when he says ask the world how they feel and they wind up in paradox.|

Using the Making Connections Strategy|
As you read the paragraph: 1. Can you make connections to anything you read about in the passage? 2. Do you remember feeling the same way? 3. What happened? | Your connections to the passage: I can remember sitting at home watching the election wondering what the outcome is going to be. Will our new President be able to get the economy back on track and will he be accepted as a great President. |

Using the Visualizing Strategy|
What is in the passage that you can see, or visualize as you read?| Your visualizations of the text: I can see myself getting ready to vote and people giving their opinion on what they think of the election.|

Using the Summarizing Strategy|
1. What are one or two sentences that describe what you read? | Your summary of the passage: The world is very optimistic and hopeful that the way the economy is will not be this way for long. I guess you can say it’s better to have something then nothing at all.|

Reading #2: Dieters take Note

Eating out can sabotage your weight-loss plan.

Predicting|
Read the title and first sentence above. Now predict what you think the passage will be about.| Your prediction about the passage: Falling back off your diet.|

Now read the whole paragraph.

Reading #2 Dieters Take Note

Eating out can sabotage your weight-loss plan. Dieters and binge eaters ate between 226 and...
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