Modligiani and Miller's Capital Structure Theory

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 131
  • Published : May 4, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
 Capital
 structure
 decisions:
 To
 M&M
 and
 beyond
  Introduction
  Modigliani
 and
 Miller’s
 proposition
 one
 states
 that
 by
 introducing
 debt
 financing
  does
 not
 change
 the
 value
 of
 the
 firm
 or
 the
 value
 of
 the
 firm’s
 cash-­‐flows
 but
  only
 the
 way
 that
 these
 cash-­‐flows
 of
 the
 firm
 are
 split
 between
 its
 debt
 and
  equity
 holders.
 
 This
 is
 the
 principle
 of
 conservation
 of
 value:
 
 “no
 change
 in
 the
  investment
 value
 of
 the
 enterprise
 as
 a
 whole
 would
 result
 from
 a
 change
 in
 its
  capitalization.”[1]
 
 Therefore,
 the
 value
 of
 the
 firm
 is
 equal
 to
 the
 value
 of
 its
 debt
  plus
 its
 equity.
  V
 =
 D
 +
 E
  Modigliani
 and
 Miller’s
 proposition
 two
 states
 that
 by
 introducing
 debt
 financing
  does
 not
 change
 the
 cost
 of
 capital
 to
 the
 firm
 but
 merely
 changes
 the
 way
 risk
 is
  divided
 between
 debt-­‐holders
 and
 equity-­‐holders.
 
 This
 is
 the
 principle
 of
  conservation
 of
 risk.
 
 Because
 debt
 has
 a
 prior
 claim
 on
 the
 firm’s
 cash-­‐flows,
  the
 introduction
 of
 debt
 increases
 the
 risk
 to
 shareholders
 since
 shareholders’
  returns
 come
 after
 those
 of
 debt-­‐holders.
 
 This
 is
 effectively
 a
 transfer
 of
 risk
  from
 debt
 to
 equity
 –
 because
 debt
 claims
 come
 before
 those
 of
 equity
 (for
 the
  same
 firm)
 debt
 will
 be
 less
 risky
 (than
 equity)
 but
 the
 presence
 of
 this
 debt
  makes
 equity
 returns
 more
 risky
 (than
 for
 an
 all
 equity
 financed
 firm).
 
 The
  overall
 risk
 of
 the
 firm
 remains
 unchanged,
 just
 the
 way
 that
 risk
 is
 divided
  between
 debt
 and
 equity
 changes
 as
 the
 capital
 structure
 changes.
 
  ko
 =
 (D/V)kd
 +
 (E/V)ke
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 and
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ke
 =
 ko
 +
 (ko
 –
 kd)(D/E)
 
  Why
 does
 debt
 make
 equity
 more
 risky?
  The
 way
 I
 think
 of
 it
 is
 as
 a
 queuing
 problem.
 
 In
 the
 case
 of
 an
 all
 equity
 firm,
 the
  equity-­‐holders
 get
 all
 the
 returns
 -­‐
 there
 is
 no
 one
 in
 front
 of
 them
 in
 the
 queue
  for
 returns
 from
 the
 company.
  In
 the
 case
 of
 a
 firm
 with
 debt,
 the
 debt
 holders
 have
 a
 priority
tracking img