Modernism

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‘The rise of modernism: challenging tradition’ act as a foundation of the topic ‘Modernism: changing the ways we see the world’. I would like to focus on how Impressionism and Post-impressionism related to each other through the social, artistic and cultural development. Both Impressionism and Post-impressionism includes the most famous works of modern art such as Claude Monet’s Notre Dame Cathedral series and Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night.

Impressionism and Post-impressionism are included in lecture 8 and lecture 9 respectively. The principles of lecture 8 ‘The rise of modernism: challenging tradition’ are mainly about Japonisme and impressionism, showing how Japanese woodblock paint influences impressionist to challenge the traditional way of painting and introducing the unique style of impressionism compare to traditional painting; while lecture 9 ‘Modernism: changing the ways we see the world’ discussed post-impressionism, cubism, symbolism, art nouveau, fauvism, showing how they contribute to modernism.

The meanings of ‘The rise of modernism: challenging tradition’ and ‘Modernism: changing the ways we see the world’ to the social, artistic and cultural development are correlated, just like a continuous motion. ‘The rise of modernism: challenging tradition’ aims to review the traditional style painting and challenge the tradition which asking for a revolution of arts. While ‘Modernism: changing the ways we see the world’ is the process that continues the action of previous topic, changing people perception of viewing arts, which abandoning the tradition ways but perform art as an expression of artists.

Impressionism (1860-1900) and post-impressionism (1880-1910) are closely related with each other since they are co-existed during late 19th century before world war I. Post-impressionism comes after impressionism; however it is in contradiction of impressionism. It shares dissatisfaction with the formlessness of impressionist painting, in which it...
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