Milgram, S. (1974) Obedience to Authority. Predictions and Variations Conclusion.

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Milgram, S. (1974) Obedience to Authority. Predictions and variations conclusion.

Summary of Milgram’s study detailing the average levels of shock ‘teachers’ administered and the percentage of ‘teachers’ administering the maximum voltage with results reported by prediction and type of authority variation. The data shows during the experimental conditions the highest average voltage that ‘teachers’ stopped administering shocks was in the original study (368 Volts) with the highest percentage of ‘teachers’ administering the maximum voltage again being in the original study (65.0). In the predictions college students recorded the highest average voltage (140). This implies that when in the presence of authority levels of obedience raise. The lowest average voltage during the experimental conditions was when two experimenters gave conflicting instructions (75 Volts) with the lowest percentage administering the maximum voltage again being in the same experiment (0). In the predictions psychiatrists recorded the lowest average level (123). Both predictions predicted the lowest percentage administering the maximum voltage (0). This implies receiving conflicting instructions does not indicate compliance lowering our obedience level. The main findings appear to show that most people would inflict pain on another human being if instructions were given by someone they believe to be an authority figure.

How far will ordinary people go to inflict harm on another human being on the orders of
authority?
This report aims to
* Summarise the key features of Milgram’s Obedience to Authority study * Identify the ethics behind the experiment
* Identify and understand the key findings of Milgram’s study surrounding personality and situation * Explain how Milgram’s study, although unable to be replicated in today’s society, is still relevant Background:

Stanley Milgram (1933-1984) a social psychologist was regarded as one of the most controversial...
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