Medication Reconcilliation

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 86
  • Published : March 18, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
TABLE OF CONTENT
INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………….3 OBJECTIVE………………………………………………………………………..4
METHODOLOGY………………………………………………………………….4
RESEARCH
INTERVIEWS AND SURVEYS…………………………………………..4
LITERATURE REVIEW: PREVIOUS AND CONTUNUING RESEARCH…….8
CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………………….10
REFERENCES………………………………………………………………….....12
APPENDIX
APPENDIX A: SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE…………………………..13
APPENDIX B: QUESTIONNAIRE ANALYSIS………………………..14

Introduction
Medication discrepancies are explained to be the ‘unsolved differences between regimens patients think they should be taking and those ordered by their physicians across different sites of care’ (Schnipper, 2006). Unfortunately medication discrepancies are said to be common occurrence, especially after hospitalizations, and are a frequent cause of adverse events (ADE’s). A study published in 2006 revealed that medication discrepancies were found to be the cause of slightly over half of all preventable ADE’s that occur within 30 days after a hospitalization discharge (Schnipper, 2006). Significant changes in patient medication regimens are common during hospital stays. The proper reconciliation and timely transfer of new treatment regimens improve the continuity of hospital handoff of patient treatment and ultimately prevent the likelihood of ADE’s (Sunil et al. 2007). A study of hospitalized elders found that 40% of all admission medications were discontinued by discharge and 45% of all discharge medications were newly started during the hospitalization (Schnipper, 2006). This study outcome clearly reveals the overwhelming potential for ADEs and the need for sufficient communication at transition points. The discharge summary is the most common method for documenting the diagnostic findings, hospital management, and arrangements for post discharge follow-up of the patient (Sunil et al. 2007). The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health care Organizations (JCAHO) recommends that discharge summaries for patients should be completed and sent to the primary care physician within 30 days of a hospital discharge. However, it seems that despite the setting of this standard procedure, inadequate communication still exits. One of the JCAHO’s national patient safety goals is the reconciliation of medications at care transitions (Sunil et al. 2007). To date, JCAHO mandates reconciliation of medication at the time of hospital admission and discharge to reduce discrepancies and avoidable harm to patients.

Study Objective
The focus of this study is to investigate the satisfaction and timeliness of hospital communication to primary caregivers referencing medication regimen changes and reconciliation made during a patients’ stay. Concentration was placed on the 65 and older Medicare group. Methodology

Three separate face-to-face interviews were conducted with various health care practitioners in the primary care setting including Dr. Francisco Neira, Christina Elders PA-C., and Dr. Lindsay Foote of Baylor Family Health Center. Questionnaires were distributed to various medical staff members in the primary care setting. The medical staff members involved in our investigation includes six Primary Care Physicians, four Physician Assistants, and five Registered Nurse Practitioners. The questionnaire and interviews focused on all of the major points of our objective: satisfaction with hospital communication, satisfaction with timeliness of discharge summaries, and the quality and degree of information received about medication regimen changes implemented in the hospital. Interviews and Surveys

The communication between primary care providers, i.e. Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs), and secondary care providers, i.e. hospitals is imperative to deliver quality health care to patients and in preventing avoidable hospital readmissions (HealthCare.gov, 2011).

When asked about the process through which the health care providers receive the...
tracking img