Mechanical and Creep Testing

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EN1029 LABORATORY

Laboratory MT

STUDENT Rose Simon
NAME:

STUDENT
NUMBER 1240682

DATE EXPERIMENT Wednesday 07 February (Week 2)
PERFORMED:

DATE OF SUBMISSION: Friday 15 February (Week 3)

Declaration
In submitting this report, I hereby declare that, except where I have made clear and full reference to the work of others, this submission, and all the material (e.g. text, pictures, diagrams) contained in it, is my own work, has not previously been submitted for assessment, and I have not knowingly allowed it to be copied by another student. In the case of group projects, the contribution of group members has been appropriately quantified. I understand that deceiving, or attempting to deceive, examiners by passing off the work of another as my own are plagiarism. I also understand that plagiarising another's work, or knowingly allowing another student to plagiarise from my work, is against University Regulations and that doing so will result in loss of marks and disciplinary proceedings. I understand and agree that the University’s plagiarism software ‘Turnitin’ may be used to check the originality of the submitted coursework.

CREEP AND MECHANICAL TESTING

ROSE SIMON

Abstract
The experiment consisted of two parts of investigation, Mechanical and Creep testing. Under mechanical testing, two medium carbon steel (04%) specimens that had been through different heat treatment were tested on tension and for hardness. One had been cold drawn and the other was normalised. The specimens were grinded using fine and coarse silicon carbide paper to give a smooth finishing before testing using a Vickers Hardness testing machine. The indenter was pressed into the specimens by an accurately controlled test force and the size of the indentation was observed by measuring the diagonals and averaging them out to get the Vickers hardness. The cold drawn specimen had a higher Vickers hardness of 285 and the normalised specimen had a Vickers hardness of 191 as shown in Table.1 on the results section. The specimens were also tested on tension using a Testometric tensile testing machine. The specimens were subjected to an increasing load, and the stress and strain were observed on the machine. The yield load and ultimate loads were used to calculate the yield strength and ultimate strength of the samples. It was concluded that the cold drawn steel specimen was harder and less ductile than the normalised steel which was more ductile and less hard. A lead specimen was also tested on creep. The specimen was assembled on a lever arm which was connected to an electronic dial gauge, a weight carrier and a thermometer was used to measure the experimental temperature, a load of 9.807 N (1kg) was placed on the weight carrier and applied a constant load to the specimen. The experiment was timed and the dial gauge readings were taken as the specimen was extending and were used to calculate the strain. A strain versus time graph was plotted and was used to calculate the secondary creep strain rate which is the constant and longest portion of the graph. It was concluded that the material properties of Lead and its low melting point affected its performance under creep deformation.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page number

1. Introduction………………………………….... 1

2. Theory ………………………………………… 1

2.1Mechanical Properties……………………. 2 2.2 Creep Deformation……………………….. 3
3. Experimental Procedure and Results……..... 5 4.1 Experimental Procedure……………….. 5 4.2 Results…………………………………… 7 4. Discussion……………………………………... 11 5.3 Mechanical Testing……………………... 11 5.4 Creep Testing …………………………... 11 5. Conclusion…………………………………….. 11

6. References…………………………………….. 12...
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