Maslow Model

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Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is an important psychological theory originated by the American psychologist Abraham Maslow. Ref: A Theory of Human Motivation (1943). NEW: Add your comments to the Deepermind Blog

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
1 Self Actualization Needs
(full potential)
2 Esteem Needs
(self respect, personal worth, autonomy)
3 Love and Belongingness Needs
(love, friendship, comradeship)
4 Safety Needs
(security; protection from harm)
5 Physiological Needs
(food, sleep, stimulation, activity)

B Values
In general, values reflect one's judgment and helps sort out what is important in life. Maslow described what he considered important values that defined one's Being. These important values were termed "B Values." Those who were self actualized tended to incorporate more B Values than those at lower levels. The B Values include: * Wholeness/Unity/Oneness

* Perfection/Just-so-ness
* Completion/Finality/Ending
* Justice/Fairness
* Aliveness/Full-Functioning
* Richness/Intricacy
* Simplicity/Essential/Honesty
* Beauty/Form/Richness
* Goodness/Oughtness
* Uniqueness/Idiosyncrasy/Novelty
* Effortlessness/Ease/Perfect
* Playfulness/Joy/Humor
* Truth/Reality/Beauty/Pure
* Self-Sufficiency/Independence
History
Maslow helped to move psychology from spinal reflex theory of Sechenov (1863) and Pavlov (1927) and also from the non-introspective thinking of behaviorism originated by Watson (1913) and amplified by Skinner (1948). Maslow changed psychology forever by elevating psychology to a new and far deeper understanding of what is means to be human. Instead of trying to make sense of the insanity of broken minds, he explored the sanity that made people exemplary. For example, he explored what Albert Einstein and Eleanor Roosevelt had in common. Instead of visiting the auto junk yard, he visited the auto show room! One of the results from Maslow studies was that there were layers of needs. If basic needs are not met, then there is a tendency to ignore higher needs. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is often portrayed as a pyramid.

My Ideas

Adding Spiritual Needs
Spiritual Needs - They Need to be Included Too
I am not sure where to put spiritual needs. We can access them when we are at any level in the hierarchy. I put them on top to present their importance. They are the source of goodness. Maslow could not be "scientific" if he included spiritual ideas directly in his theories. But his ideas of self actualization come close to those of a person connected with Source. Putting a yellow cap on the diagram signifies that goodness flows to the other levels for us to identify our needs. Goodness is reference for selection at all levels. What is good for the body, what is the best way to be secure, how to have people like you, and how to like yourself are based on knowing goodness. Goodness

So what is goodness? Maslow created a list of Being Values (B-Values) that help define goodness. These values are the values that Maslow found that the best people had more or less in common. Some of the B-values include: love, direction, wholeness, integration, the need to finish and to have a true destiny point. Without goodness, we don't have a clue, we are just dust in the wind, making choices without priority. Without reference, different parts of the mind will fight for their limited desires, and this leads to a divided mind and potentially to internal wars within the mind.

Maslow's Levels Detailed
Self Actualization -Fulfillment Needs This is the rare level where people have need of purpose, personal growth and realization of their potentials. This is the point where people start to become fully functional, acting purely on their own volition and having a healthy personality. Ego -Self Esteem Needs We need to believe in ourselves and have healthy pride. At this level we need self-respect, and respect from others....
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