Macbeth in 21 Century English

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Original Text | Modern Text | |
| Enter BANQUO | BANQUO enters. |
510 | BANQUO Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all, As the weird women promised, and I fear Thou played’st most foully for ’t. Yet it was said It should not stand in thy posterity, But that myself should be the root and father Of many kings. If there come truth from them— As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine— Why, by the verities on thee made good, May they not be my oracles as well, And set me up in hope? But hush, no more. | BANQUO Now you have it all: you’re the king, the thane of Cawdor, and the thane of Glamis, just like the weird women promised you. And I suspect you cheated to win these titles. But it was also prophesied that the crown would not go to your descendants, and that my sons and grandsons would be kings instead. If the witches tell the truth—which they did about you—maybe what they said about me will come true too. But shhh! I’ll shut up now. | | Sennet sounded. Enter MACBETH, as king, LADY MACBETH, as queen, LENNOX, ROSS, LORDS,LADIES, and attendants | A trumpet plays. MACBETH enters dressed as king, and LADY MACBETH enters dressed as queen, together with LENNOX, ROSS, LORDS,LADIES, and their attendants | | MACBETH Here’s our chief guest. | MACBETH (indicating BANQUO) Here’s our most important guest. | | LADY MACBETH If he had been forgotten, It had been as a gap in our great feast, And all-thing unbecoming. | LADY MACBETH If we forgot him, our big celebration wouldn’t be complete, and that wouldn’t be any good. | 15 | MACBETH Tonight we hold a solemn supper, sir, And I’ll request your presence. | MACBETH (to BANQUO) Tonight we’re having a ceremonial banquet, and I want you to be there. | | BANQUO      Let your highness Command upon me, to the which my duties Are with a most indissoluble tie Forever knit. | BANQUO Whatever your highness commands me to do, it is always my duty to do it. |

Original Text | Modern Text | |
20 | MACBETH Ride you this afternoon? | MACBETH Are you going riding this afternoon? | | BANQUO Ay, my good lord. | BANQUO Yes, my good lord. | 25 | MACBETH We should have else desired your good advice— Which still hath been both grave and prosperous— In this day’s council, but we’ll take tomorrow. Is ’t far you ride? | MACBETH We would have liked to have heard your good advice, which has always been serious and helpful, at the council today, but we’ll wait until tomorrow. Are you riding far? | | BANQUO As far, my lord, as will fill up the time 'Twixt this and supper. Go not my horse the better, I must become a borrower of the night For a dark hour or twain. | BANQUO I’m going far enough that I’ll be riding from now until dinner. Unless my horse goes faster than expected, I will be back an hour or two after sunset. | | MACBETH      Fail not our feast. | MACBETH Don’t miss our feast. | 30 | BANQUO My lord, I will not. | BANQUO My lord, I won’t miss it. | 35 | MACBETH We hear our bloody cousins are bestowed In England and in Ireland, not confessing Their cruel parricide, filling their hearers With strange invention. But of that tomorrow, When therewithal we shall have cause of state Craving us jointly. Hie you to horse. Adieu, Till your return at night. Goes Fleance with you? | MACBETH We hear that the princes, those murderers, have hidden in England and Ireland. They haven’t confessed to cruelly murdering their own father, and they’ve been making up strange lies to tell their hosts. But we can talk more about that tomorrow, when we’ll discuss matters of state that concern us both. Hurry up and get to your horse. Good-bye, until you return tonight. Is Fleance going with you? | | BANQUO Ay, my good lord. Our time does call upon ’s. | BANQUO Yes, my good lord. It’s time we hit the road. |...
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