Macbeth's Self Destruction

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Ambition is often the driving force in people’s life. People often pushed by ambition to acquire the things they desire. It’s a motivational force. Sometimes ambition seems to be a necessary character for a leader because these strong eagers of willing to win the battles usually make him stronger. However, ambition is a two-edged human quality that it’s a good thing if we can control it but it can also make people do bad things. Eventually, if ambition is driving over people, it would be the situation of Macbeth. In Shakespeare’s play, Macbeth is the protagonist who is also a great general that brings countless victories to Scotland. However, when he hears the prophecies from the witch sisters, his ambition drives him crazy and makes him kill King Duncan in order to acquire the throne he desires. Therefore, the ambition is the tragic flaw that leads downfall of Macbeth.

After the scene that Macbeth hears the witch sister’s prophecies, Macbeth’s ambition becomes the only thing that he has in his mind. However, ambition drives him to kill other people in order to stay in power or even kill King Duncan to become the king of Scotland. Ambition certainly is the key factor pushed Macbeth to murder “What he hath lost, noble Macbeth hath won” (1.2.67). Referring to Macbeth has earned to be Thane of Cawdor and others would think that he’s satisfied, but this is not the case. In his mind, the desire to be above the others becomes greater and greater. Once he steps in, he cannot go back “I have no spur to prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition, which o’erleaps itself. And falls on th’other…” (1.7.25). Macbeth has realized that his ambition becomes too great and leads to make him doing something bad, murder. However, he cannot stop his ambition to burgeon. Therefore ambition drives him too far, and ended up with getting himself killed, love ones and many more.

“All of Shakespeare's great tragic figures are isolated in a universe essentially of their own...
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