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The Jim Corbett National Park is a heaven for the adventure seeker and wildlife adventure lovers. Corbett National Park is India's first national park which comprises 520.8 km2. area of hills, riverine belts, marshy depressions, grass lands and large lake. The elevation ranges from 1,300 feet to 4,000 feet. Winter nights in Corbett national park are cold but the days are bright and sunny. It rains from July to September.

Dense moist deciduous forest mainly consists of sal, haldu, pipal, rohini and mango trees, and these trees cover almost 73 per cent of the park. The 10 per cent of the area consists of grasslands. It houses around 110 tree species, 50 species of mammals, 580 bird species and 25 reptile species.

The park is located between 29°25' to 29°39'N latitude and 78°44' to 79°07'E longitude.[8] The average altitude of the region ranges between 360 m (1,181 ft) and 1,040 m (3,412 ft).[3] It has numerous ravines, ridges, minor streams and small plateaus with varying aspects and degrees of slopes

A total of 488 different species of plants have been recorded in the park

Over 585 species of resident and migratory birds have been categorized, including the crested serpent eagle, blossom-headed parakeet and the red junglefowl — ancestor of all domestic fowl.[6] 33 species of reptiles, seven species of amphibians, seven species of fish and 37 species of dragonflies have also been recorded.[8]

Kanha

Kanha area was divided into two sanctuaries, Hallon and Banjar, of 250 and 300 km² each. Kanha National Park was created on 1 June, 1955. Today it stretches over an area of 940 km² in the two districts Mandla and Balaghat. Together with a surrounding buffer zone of 1,067 km² and the neighboring 110 km² Phen Sanctuary it forms the Kanha Tiger Reserve[1]. This makes it the largest National Park in Central India[2]

Kanha National Park is home to over 600 species of flowering plants.[3] The lowland forest is a mixture of sal (Shorea robusta) and other mixed forest trees, interspersed with meadows. The highland forests are tropical moist dry deciduous type and of a completely different nature with bamboo on slopes (Dendrocalamus strictus). A very good looking Indian ghost tree (kullu) can also be seen in the dense forest.

Reptiles Python, Cobra, Krait, Rat Snake, Viper, Keelbacks, Grass snakes etc are nocturnal animals rarely seen. There are many species of turtles as well as amphibians found in or near the water bodies

Area: (core) 940 km²
Terrain: sal and bamboo forests, plateaus, meadows and meandering streams Best Season: February to June
Morning Visiting Hours: 6:30 am to 12:00 noon
Evening Visiting Hours: 3:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Closed: 1 July to 15 October
The Nearest Airport is Nagpur & Jabalpur ( Distance 275 Km. & 175 Km. Respectively) Kanha

Darrah

Darrah National Park in Rajasthan, India is a national park established in 2004 consisting of three wildlife sanctuaries in Rajasthan - Darrah WLS, Chambal WLS and Jaswant Sagar WLS. The national park contains large tracts of forests formerly part of the Maharaja of Kota's hunting grounds. The park was embroiled in a political controversy over its nomenclature, when the Bharatiya Janata Party state government revoked the decision that it be called the Rajiv Gandhi National Park The park stretches over 643 square kilometres (248 sq mi), protecting the wildlife of Karnataka. Together with the adjoining Bandipur National Park (870 km2 (340 sq mi)), Mudumalai National Park (320 km2 (120 sq mi)) and Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary (344 km2 (133 sq mi)), it forms the largest protected area in Southern India, totaling 2,183 km2 (843 sq mi). Nagarhole has a large elephant population; and tigers, leopards, wild dogs, and sloth bears are found in viable numbers. The large predators prey on a variety of ungulates, like gaur, sambar deer, chital (spotted deer), common muntjac, four-horned antelope, mouse deer and wild boar. Gray langurs, lion-tailed macaques...
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