Last Sinner Eater Lilybet Analysis

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The wind wailed relentlessly against the windows of the old house. The youngest child gazed unblinkingly through the window into the restless sea. From the mist, a shadow figure began to form and a sharp gasp escaped from the child’s lips. The ghost rose majestically from the mist and danced wildly in the air. Its dark golden eyes pierced straight into the eyes of the petrified child. A high pitched scream slipped from the lips of the child and suddenly the sun peeked from behind the clouds. The entire world seemed to calm in one soothing motion and a small smile crept unto the lips of the child. The shadowy figure had been replaced by a large white flag. The unknown can seem frightening and ominous at times. In The Last Sin Eater by Francine Rivers, an unknown spirit named Lilybet by the heroine of the story,Cadi Forbes, seems tp the villagers of the town to be an ominous being.There are many theories throughout the town regarding Lilybet. The main thought that is shared between many of the characters in the novel, The Last Sin Eater, is that Lilybet is some sort of “taint” (p.?) , meaning ghost.Most believe it is the ghost of Cadi’s deceased sister,Elen. Everyone in the village, other than Cadi, that knows of Lilybet knows that she is not of the physical realm. The way that the villagers react to Lilybet shows that most of them see Lilybet as a portentous character. Many seem to feel that Cadi should push Lilybet away because they think that Lilybet may harm Cadi’s soul.In some ways the character of Lilybet seems to support these thoughts. She is never seen by anyone other than Cadi.Also sometimes, Lilybet suggests that Cadi do things her parents and other adults in the village would not approve of. One of the examples of the many of the incorrect views on Lilybet is the views of Gervase Odera,the town healer. She believes that Cadi should “close [her] heart to this Lilybet.”(p39) The majority of characters in the book share this view. Gervase believes...
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