Land Pollution

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Pamantasan ng Cabuyao
College of Business Administration and Accountancy

Land

Pollution

LAND POLLUTION

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Land Pollution

Land pollution is basically about contaminating the land surface of the earth through dumping urban waste matter indiscriminately, dumping of industrial waste, mineral exploitation, and misusing the soil by harmful agricultural practices. Pollution includes visible litter and waste along with the soil itself being polluted. The soil gets polluted by the chemicals in pesticides and herbicides used for agricultural purposes along with waste matter being littered in urban areas such as roads, parks, and streets.

Land pollution is the result of human misuse of soil. Poor agricultural practices, digging up of important resources and dumping of garbage underground can cause land pollution. Urbanization, the growth of rural lands into urban areas and industrialization that results in the formation of an industrial society are regarded as the two main causes of land pollution. The excavation of minerals, the increasing quarrying and mining activities lead to land pollution. The excavation and mining activities lead to the loosening of soil. Increased mechanization leads to the contamination of soil, thus causing severe land pollution. Deforestation is one of the major causes of loosening of soil, that in turn causes soil erosion. The soil that is left naked on harvesting crops from agricultural lands is vulnerable to being eroded by wind and water. Intensive agricultural practices cause the soil cover to lose its nutritional elements, making it of no use for agriculture. Excessive use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers causes soil contamination. Chemicals can prove harmful to the animal and plant life. An excessive use of chemicals leads to a decrease in the fertility of soil. Certain herbicides and insecticides lead to toxicity of soil. Fungicides contain copper and mercury, which are extremely harmful to the soil as well as the plant and animal life that thrives in it. Inefficient and unhealthy methods of soil management and harmful irrigation practices lead to soil pollution. Agricultural and industrial waste, solids from sewage treatment plants, ashes and garbage are other causes of land pollution. The accumulation of inorganic wastes in soil poses a threat to the plant and animal life in that area. Garbage is carelessly dumped into the soil. Non-biodegradable wastes such as plastic and rubber prove lethal to the life in the soil. Plastic and glass bottles, cans, rubber tires and electronic items dumped in the soil make up the main cause of land pollution. Solid wastes are harmful to the terrestrial plants and animals.

One of the major consequences of land pollution is the imbalance in nature, resulting from the harm caused to the wildlife and vegetation on the land. It adversely affects the human respiratory system and results in various skin problems if the toxic materials of the soil come in contact with the skin. The consumption of fruits and vegetables that are grown in contaminated soil can lead to several health hazards in human beings. When contaminated soil is washed away in the water reservoirs, it leads to water pollution, which is lethal to the aquatic flora and fauna. The soil contaminants are driven by the wind, causing air pollution, which is detrimental to health. It is high time we realize the importance of soil and devise ways to curb land pollution. Maximum use of biodegradable materials and implementation of recycling in order to reuse resources are some of the excellent methods of preventing land pollution. It is important to implement proper methods of disposal of organic waste. It is necessary to educate the masses about the causes and effects of land pollution. We cannot take Mother Earth for granted. The process of contamination of the land surface of the Earth...
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