Kramer Pharmaceuticals Case Study

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Harvard Case Study
Kramer Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
By: Derek A. Newton

Management “Honors” 3300
Section EMWA
Professor Walsh

Kris Bonilla
Daniella DiBenedetto

Fact Sheet:
* Company name: Kramer Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
* Major manufacturer of prescription drugs.
* Sales force of over 500 detailers
* Detailers responsible for about 200 accounts
* 35 District managers
* Detailer: Bob Marsh
* Worked for Kramer Pharmaceuticals for 12 years
* Territory in Toledo, Ohio
* District Supervisors
* John Meredith
* Bill Couch
* Jim Rathbun
* Vince Reed
* Tom Wilkens
* Ted Franklin
* Starting Salary $14,000
* Ending Salary $25,000
* Hired under John Meredith
* Fired under Ted Franklin

Issues:
1. Expectations
2. Managing Your Boss
3. Coaching
4. Sales Training

Expectations

Although Bob was good in the field and communicating with others, his new supervisors had certain expectations as to how things should be done. Their expectations are one of the issues that caused the management failure in question.

A. Make Bob a Team Leader| B. Orientation| C. Do not focus on his previous record with the company| Pro’s| Con’s| Pro’s| Con’s| Pro’s| Con’s| Bob can see the importance of planning and organizing| Might feel too much of a sense of entitlement| Chance to learn what’s expected of you| Too much information in one day| Supervisors won’t cast immediate judgment| Might fall back into bad habits| Bob can consider a leader’s point of view on his behavior| Might influence others in his group to be disorganized| Get to know company’s culture| Not all information from company is shared| Allows Bob to prove his worthiness| Might not get better| Interact and learn more about other employees| Cause too much self worth| Sense of pride in your company| Not a lot of interaction| Gives bob a chance to change and not be judged on his previous mistakes| Only chance to prove himself|

We have chosen Decisions C

The solution we feel will help overcome this issue the best is solution C. In this case, Bob has been fired because of his lack of ability to organize and plan as his employers feel is necessary. Although he always gets the job done and has amazing customer rapport; his higher ups weren’t happy with the way he goes about doing things. Each time a new supervisor came into Bob Marsh’s district, they reviewed previous reports from previous supervisors. We feel as if this has played a big role in their assumptions of him. If instead of doing so, they should evaluate him as if he’s never been evaluated before so they won’t cast immediate judgment of him. The upside of this solution is that it allows him to prove himself and his changed working habits. In the first scenario under supervision of John Meredith after he brought disorganization and lack of planning up to his attention, Marsh made it his duty to fix it and he did. So much so, that Meredith stated “Marsh’s effort to improve his call planning and overall organization had impressed Meredith to the point that he now rated this aspect of the job as completely satisfactory”. This proves that he did in fact change his working habits if it wasn’t that the supervisors saw previous reports of him the seed wouldn’t have been planted in their head about his lack of organization skills. The down side to this solution is that he might fall back into bad habits. Sometimes you need to be reminded of the wrong your capable of doing to ensure you don’t fall back into that path again. But to ensure that this will not happen, you can just remind employees of what is expected of them and how it’s expected to be done on a regular basis.

Managing Your Boss
Another issue we feel played a role in this “management failure” is his lack of ability to manage his boss or in this case his bosses. He didn’t...
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